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<<153154155156157158159160161162>> Total results:8068 References Per Page:

Wellbeing Key Driver in Milk Launches

February 1, 2009: 04:13 PM EST
More than half (53 percent) of the milk-based beverages launched in 2008 promoted health as their primary benefit, a 42 percent increase over 2007, says Innova. Health benefits were part of the marketing mix for 17 percent of last year’s new products. There was a 10 percent increase (from 164 to 181 products) in beverages containing inulin and oligofructose, both of which are prebiotics. Gut health featured in 17 percent of the product launches, up from 13 percent in 2007 and 2 percent five years ago. Low fat claims fell from 17 percent to 2 percent, low sugar claims dropped from 3 percent to 2 percent, and convenience claims dropped from 34 percent to 17 percent. The trends “reflected the fact that consumers were becoming increasingly aware of specific health claims within the well-being category”, says Tim Van der Schraelen, Beneo-Orafti's marketing and communication manager. The survey was commissioned by Beneo-Orafti.
"Dairy Drinks: Health in Control as Convenience takes Back Seat", Functional Ingredients, February 01, 2009, © Penton Media, Inc.
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Shelf Tags Provide Nutrition Information

February 1, 2009: 08:21 PM EST
In-store labeling systems that identify healthy products are becoming more popular in supermarket chains across the US. Some groups, such as Ahold USA's Stop & Shop and Giant-Landover, Supervalu, and regional chains Price Chopper and Hy-Vee, are using proprietary systems, others are basing labels on FDA guidelines or ranking developed by private companies in association with researchers. The chains are also using booklets, ceiling banners, promotional messages and websites to promote their schemes. Retailers say the programs promote healthy-eating habits, boost customer loyalty and improve the shopping experience. Some reports indicate sales of labeled items are increasing. Many packaged-food manufacturers are also involved in a national labeling program developed by nonprofit organization The Keystone Centre. Scheduled to launch in summer, the "Smart Choices Program" uses federal government guidelines to identify healthy foods. Participating companies include Kraft Foods, General Mills, ConAgra and Unilever.
"Supermarkets Tag Along on Nutrition", In-Store Marketer, February 01, 2009, © In-Store Marketing Institute
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Fat on the Menu at R&D Seminar

February 1, 2009: 04:07 PM EST
Consumers are looking at the facts on nutritional labels rather than the claims, says Marjorie Gilbert, food ingredients director for AarhusKarlshamn USA Inc. In a presentation (“The Fact of the Matter: The Facts are in the Nutritional Panel”) to Prepared Foods’ 2008 R&D Seminar-East, Gilbert cited figures from a June 2007 IFIC study that shows consumers look first for the expiry date, then the Nutrition Facts Panel, then the ingredient statement. Fewer looked at statements about health and nutrition benefits in 2007 than they did in 2006. When looking at the nutrition label, they look first for calories, then total fats, then trans fats. Saturated fats are sixth on the list. Olive oil is considered the healthiest, followed by canola, soybean and sunflower. Other presentations covered reducing fat in chocolate; use of omega-3 oils in products; emulsifiers in cakes; and use of omega-6.
"Fats From Nutritional Nuances to Physical Functionality", Prepared Foods, February 01, 2009, © BNP Media
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More to a Bar than Meets the Eye

February 1, 2009: 04:18 PM EST
Nutrition bars have the potential to offer all things to all people – if flavor and texture stability issues can be overcome. Challenges include the desired taste, flavor and color of the finished product, solubility, bioavailability, pH level, safety/toxicity, interactions among various ingredients and bioavailability and stability of the individual ingredients, says Ram Chaudhari, PhD, FACN, CNS, senior executive vice president and chief scientific officer of Fortitech. Balancing high-protein bars, adding vitamins at the right stage of the process, and selecting the correct form of a particular nutrient are crucial factors, Chaudhari says. When it comes to ingredients, old favorites like protein, vitamins and minerals still rule, but superfruits such as açai, goji berry, mangosteen, pomegranate and blueberry are increasingly popular. Bars that target specific health issues look to be the way to the future, as are meal replacement bars. Look for more bars that contain vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, zinc, omega 3s, fiber, prebiotics, CoQ10, soy, whey proteins and antioxidants, Chaudhari says. They’ll also start appearing in a wider range of outlets.
"Bar Basics", Nutraceuticals World, February 01, 2009, © Nutraceuticals World
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Bakers Crack the Health Barrier

February 1, 2009: 08:32 PM EST
Bakers are responding to the “better for you” trend with a range of innovations designed to retain the “feel good” factor of baked goods while taking out the “bad” ingredients and adding “good” ones. Much of the focus is on substituting good fats and sweeteners for the traditional trans fats, salt and sucrose, and on finding ways to incorporate whole grains in place of refined white flours. Fortification is going beyond the familiar iron, niacin and a few other vitamins to include many more vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, pre- and probiotics, and bulk fibers. The result is that it’s now possible to buy baked goods that touch some or all the bases: no sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, preservatives, colorings or artificial flavorings; diabetic friendly, gluten-free, dairy-free and cholesterol-free, vegan and kosher certified. Packaging is also being revolutionized, to make it easy to handle and environmentally friendly. Technology is also playing its part, developing new ingredients and processes that make it possible to produce light, soft, fluffy treats without the guilt.
David Feder, RD., "New Directions in Healthy Baking", Food Processing, February 01, 2009, © Food Processing
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Nutrition Bars Third in Popularity Race

February 1, 2009: 04:24 PM EST
Satiety, digestive health and “natural” are key ingredients for bar consumers in 2009, according to recent surveys. Fiber, probiotics and protein are the buzzwords. Neilsen Company says sales of nutrition bars totaled $416 million for the year ended October 4, 2008, up 3.5 percent over the previous 12 months. The breakfast bar category rose nearly 10 percent in that time, with sales totaling $585 million. Nutrition bars continue to trail behind granola and yogurt bars, with sales topping $1 billion. In a 2006 Mintel survey, 41 percent of respondents said they were eating more nutrition bars. Taste was the prime driver for 43 percent of these respondents. Health, wellness and physical needs such as diet motivated 14 percent. Three-quarters of consumers in 2006 were looking for a good source of protein or vitamins. But now people are more concerned about overall nutrition, says Chris Brandt, vice president of marketing for Odwalla.
Amanda Baltazar, "Nutrition Bars Fill a Role", Nutraceuticals World, February 01, 2009, © Nutraceuticals World
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Mothers Flexible over Kids’ Food

January 27, 2009: 08:26 PM EST
Mothers are choosing healthier foods for their children, and the kids are responding by beginning to like them, according to research conducted by Stamford-based Just Kid Inc. In a report entitled “The Moms Food Study: Understanding Moms’ Needs for Her Kids”, Kim Bealle, managing director of strategy and innovation, says that moms balance a number of factors when choosing food for their children. Emotional, rational and environmental factors drive the choices, which are balanced by what Mom thinks is best and what she knows her kids will like. Different factors come into play for each meal. “Eating right” topped the list of preferences: healthy and nutritious, helps establish good long-term eating habits, and “fills my child up” ranked over 80 percent in the survey. Authenticity is important, and it’s OK to add a bit of fun: healthy cereal with chocolate bits is acceptable, for example. Treats are OK for special occasions, but there’s a preference for small serving sizes to keep the number of calories down. A combination of balanced nutrition, fresh, unprocessed, fewer preservatives, all-natural foods and more traditional ingredients is the mothers’ holy grail. The kids themselves know more about healthy eating and are beginning to enjoy their fruit and vegetables, Bealle says.
Diane Toops, "Moms Choosing Healthier Foods for Kids", FoodProcessing.com, January 27, 2009, © 2004-2009 Food Processing
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Probiotic Gum Tackles Gingivitis

January 16, 2009: 04:22 PM EST
Swedish biotechnology company BioGaia AB has expanded its range of products containing the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prodentis (L. reuteri, or “Prodentis”) to include a gum that helps to control gingivitis. BioGaia has previously marketed lozenges, liquid drops and tablets containing L. reuteri, but this is the first to target “bad” bacteria in the mouth. The company says the mint-flavored, sugar-free gum, named GUM Periobalance, is backed by a recent study and anecdotal evidence. About half the US population aged over 30 is known to be affected by gingivitis. The gum is available in Europe, Scandinavia, South Africa and Indonesia.
Joanna Cosgrove, "GUM Periobalance Reduces Gingivitis with the Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri", Nutraceuticals World, January 16, 2009, © Rodman Publishing
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Kraft Enters Innovation Deal

January 16, 2009: 04:52 PM EST
Kraft Foods Global Inc has teamed with Medisyn Technologies Inc in a bid to stay ahead of the game in innovative functional foods. The research and licensing partnership is expected to enable faster and less costly development of new functional food ingredients, says Medisyn. The arrangement covers "bioactive discovery with development and commercialization milestones, as well as post-commercialization payments”.
Karlene Lukovitz, "Kraft Fast-Forwards Functional Foods", January 16, 2009, © MediaPost Communications
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Slow Eating Benefits Young Adults

January 6, 2009: 04:53 PM EST
“Slow down and eat” appears to be the key message to take away from a recent study of young adults. The research on 18-25 year olds shows that eating alone or on the run may result in less healthy food choices. Investigators from the School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, found that eating with friends and family was associated with eating more healthful foods, and with higher intakes of calcium and fiber among males. “Eating on the run" was linked to higher consumption of soft drinks, fast food and fat, and with lower intake of several healthful foods among females.
"Young Adults Need to Make More Time for Healthy Meals", January 06, 2009, © Elsevier Health Sciences
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Choline May Help Reduce Breast Cancer

December 2, 2008: 05:45 PM EST
Pregnant mothers who eat foods containing choline, such as eggs, reduce the chances that their babies will later develop breast cancer, say biologists from Boston University. The study is the first to link choline consumption during pregnancy to breast cancer, and to identify possible choline-related genetic changes that affect breast cancer survival rates. Pregnant rats were divided into three groups, and fed diets containing standard amounts of choline, no choline, or extra choline. Female offspring were then treated with a chemical that causes breast cancer. All the treated offspring developed the cancer, but those whose mothers had a high-choline diet developed slower-growing tumors than the others. The slow growing tumors had a genetic pattern similar to the pattern in breast cancers of women who are considered to have a good prognosis. The fast-growing tumors were similar to those seen in women with a more aggressive form of the disease. The researchers say that the genetic changes may result from the way that choline affects modifications of the DNA within the mammary gland of fetuses as they develop in the womb.
"Eating Eggs When Pregnant Affects Breast Cancer in Offspring", December 02, 2008, © CNS Media BV
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Lallemand and Biostime Form New Probiotics JV To Target China

November 27, 2008: 07:14 PM EST

Lallemand SAS and Biostime Inc have extended the partnership they formed in 2000 with a new joint venture to market probiotics in China. Biostime France is based in Blagnac (France) and equally owned by French probiotics maker Lallemand SAS and Chinese marketer and distributor Biostime Inc. Lallemand specializes in research, development and production, while Biostime distributes to 15,000 outlets in China. The two companies launched “Biostime Probiotic Sachet for Children” in China after it was registered there in 2002. Sales have grown 20 percent a year since then, and are expected to reach 100 million sachets in the near future. The companies now plan to market adult and senior products.

"Lallemand and Biostime Launch Probiotic JV in China", November 27, 2008, © FLEXNEWS
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Valensa International and Parry Nutraceuticals Create New Force in Natural Products Market

November 26, 2008: 07:23 PM EST
Indian and American companies have combined to market “the next generation of high-performance nutritional products from plant-derived sources for the condition-specific dietary supplement, functional food and fortified beverage sectors”. Valensa International (Orlando, USA), the vehicle of a 48 percent strategic stake held by E.I.D. Parry (India) Ltd in U.S. Nutraceuticals, has joined forces with Parry Nutraceuticals (Division of E.I.D. Parry (India) Ltd) to market a range of products, including omega-3 essential fatty acids (ALA, EPA and DHA); phycocyanins and carotenoids including astaxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. The two companies already co-market astaxanthin and Valensa's patented SpiruZan, a Spirulina/Astaxanthin product. Both companies are committed to making sustainable natural products, and focus on natural ingredients made using environmentally responsible technology. Together they combine expertise in botanical material sourcing, formulation, product development and marketing of products for health and nutrition.
"Valensa International and Parry Nutraceuticals Join Forces in the Global Natural Products Marketplace", MarketWatch, November 26, 2008, © PR Newswire
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UK Govt Launches Obesity Campaign

November 11, 2008: 07:47 PM EST
More than 12,000 grassroots organizations, including the British Heart Foundation and the Fitness Industry Association, have signed up to the UK government’s $413 million anti-obesity Change4Life initiative. Companies including Kellogg's, ITV, Asda, Tesco and PepsiCo have also signed up. The drive to tackle obesity includes price cuts on healthy food from Tesco and Adsa, a national health campaign on ITV, and Pepsi stars featuring in fitness advertisements. The government is also in talks with companies including BSkyB, Kraft and Unilever about joining the initiative, working through the Advertising Association. Health secretary Alan Johnson says the aim is to “create a lifestyle revolution that will help families to eat well, move more and live longer”.
Mark Sweney, "Government Unveils Details of £275m Anti-Obesity Push", November 11, 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2008
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Optiva Gets Heart Health Tick

November 10, 2008: 07:29 PM EST
Kellogg has gained the endorsement of UK cholesterol charity Heart UK for its Optiva cereal brand. It plans to spend $1.71 million on a UK marketing campaign to gain a larger share of the market, and has introduced a new variety, containing oat flakes, hazelnuts and almonds. Kellogg has invested $30 million in the brand since it was launched in August 2006. Optiva is available in Sainsbury's and Morrisons in the UK, and is targeted at the aging population increasingly concerned about cholesterol and heart health.
"UK: Kellogg, Heart Charity in Optivita Push", November 10, 2008, © just-food.com
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Rice Blamed for Infant Allergies, Seen To Be Worse Than Than Cow's Milk

October 28, 2008: 05:44 PM EST
Rice can cause more allergies in infants than soy or cow’s milk, say Australian researchers. Until now rice has been considered a low-allergy food, but the research at Sydney's The Children's Hospital at Westmead shows that the cereal triggers food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) in more infants than either cow or soy milk and resulted in treatment with an intravenous drip more frequently. The study of 31 infant-allergy cases was conducted over 16 years. Rice is often the first solid food introduced into an infant’s diet. They say increased consumption of rice in Australia may be a factor. FPIES doesn't occur in babies fed exclusively on breast milk.
Simeon Bennett and Carey Sargent, "Rice May Cause Worse Infant Allergies than Cow's Milk (Update1)", October 28, 2008, © Bloomberg
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BPA Protects Cancer from Treatment

October 9, 2008: 05:50 PM EST
Bisphenol A (BPA) may protect cancer cells from chemotherapy, according to a study done at the University of Cincinnati. Lead researcher Nira Ben-Jonathan said that BPA does not increase cancer cell proliferation, but acts by “protecting existing cancer cells from dying in response to anti-cancer drugs, making chemotherapy significantly less effective”. The researchers exposed human breast cells to levels of BPA found in the blood of human adults. BPA is widely used in food and beverage containers, and studies have shown it can migrate into the contents. Previous studies have indicated that high levels could cause cancer. BPA is approved as safe for use in food and drink containers by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The plastic and food industries assert that it is safe.
Tara Parker-Pope, "Plastic Chemical May Interfere With Chemotherapy", New York Times, October 09, 2008, © New York Times
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CRN at Odds with FDA over Combos

October 1, 2008: 05:38 PM EST
Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) president and CEO Steve Mister has taken Bayer’s side in a dispute with the FDA over Heart Advantage, a combination of aspirin and phytosterols that fits somewhere between an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine and a dietary supplement. The FDA has issued a warning letter stating that the entire product is a drug, maintaining that its twin claims – that aspirin keeps the blood flowing and phytosterols help to lower bad cholesterol – “may be interpreted by the consumer as medical advice”. Bayer says it stands behind both claims and that neither is intended to replace medical advice. Mister says the CRN “continues to believe that combination dietary supplement-OTC drug products have a useful and important role to play in integrated healthcare and wellness”, and urges the FDA to help companies “maneuver the regulatory challenges”. CRN says the agency has scope under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) and the US Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act to approve such combinations.
"Council for Responsible Nutrition says that Supplement-OTC Drug Products Play Important Role; FDA says Otherwise", Functional Ingredients, October 01, 2008, © Penton Media, Inc.
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