We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<166167168169170171172173174175>> Total results:9330 References Per Page:

Lack Of Omega-3 Fatty Acid DHA Renders Male Mice Infertile

April 12, 2010: 07:42 AM EST
U.S. scientists experimenting with genetically altered male mice that could not produce the omega-3 fatty acid DHA were infertile. Omega-3s have been found in recent studies to benefit cardiovascular health, but this is the first study directly linking DHA to male fertility. Without DHA, the mice produced only a few sperm, and these were misshapen (round instead of long) and basically immobile, according to researchers. When they re-introduced DHA into the mouse diets, however, fertility was completely restored. The DHA study involved the creation of a mouse model with certain genes “knocked out” to help understand the physiological role of various fats. The body makes DHA from dietary alpha-linolenic acids, derived mainly from vegetable oils such as soybean and canola.
Manuel Roqueta-Rivera, Chad K. Stroud, Wanda M. Haschek, Sandeep J.Akare, Mariangela Segre, Richard S. Brush, Martin-Paul Agbaga, Robert E.Anderson, Rex A. Hess and Manabu T. Nakamura, "Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation fully restores fertility and spermatogenesis in male delta-6 desaturase-null mice", The Journal of Lipid Research, April 12, 2010, © American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fish & Fish Products
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Alzheimer’s Study Finds Evidence Supporting Health Benefits Of Mediterranean Diet

April 12, 2010: 12:15 AM EST
A four-year U.S. study of adults over 65 years old has found that a diet rich in dairy products, red meat, organ meat and butter is strongly correlated with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists studied 2,148 older adults without dementia, and checked them for signs of dementia every year and a half. The diets of the 1,895 people who did not develop Alzheimer's included salad dressing, nuts, fish, tomatoes, poultry, and fruits, as well as cruciferous, dark and green leafy vegetables. They ate very little high-fat dairy products, red meat, organ meat or butter. The healthier diet, which featured higher intakes of nutrients such as omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E, and folate, resembles the Mediterranean diet characterized by low intakes of saturated fatty acids and vitamin B12.
Yian Gu, PhD; Jeri W. Nieves, PhD; Yaakov Stern, PhD; Jose A. Luchsinger, MD, MPH; Nikolaos Scarmeas, MD, MS, "Food Combination and Alzheimer Disease Risk A Protective Diet ", Archives of Neurology, April 12, 2010, © American Medical Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fish & Fish Products
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Soil Association Says UK’s Organic Sales Fell 2.9% Last Year

April 12, 2010: 08:39 AM EST
According to the Organic Market Report 2010, by organic industry group the Soil Association, UK sales of organic food, drink and other items fell 12.9% in 2009 to £1.84 billion, after years of double-digit growth rates, as consumers cut spending on premium-priced products and retailers reduced organic product assortment and shelf space. Supermarkets remain the largest organic channel, with 73.7% of sales. Dairy is still the largest organic food category, with 33% of sales, but category sales fell 6.5%, although organic milk grew 1%. Sales in supermarkets of the other two largest categories, fruit and vegetables and fresh meat, fell 14.8% and 22.7% respectively. Organic bread and bakery sales fell 39.8%. Organic meat sales were also hit, with organic beef down 30% and lamb 10%. Responding to consumer demand and retailer actions, organic chicken producers cut supply by 20%. It’s not all bad news: the Soil Association forecasts 2-5% growth this year and Tesco said sales of organic vegetables were again increasing. The organic industry must address its high-price and elitist image in the face of emerging evidence that there might be little nutritional benefit in organic food compared with non-organic options.
Rebecca Smithers, consumer affairs correspondent, "Organic sales slump for first time as recession takes a bite out of market", The Guardian, April 12, 2010, © Guardian News and Media Limited
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Market News
Trends
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

High-Glycemic Index Foods Increase Heart Disease Risk For Women

April 12, 2010: 08:52 AM EST
Eating carbohydrate-packed foods with a high glycemic index (GI) (e.g., bread, breakfast cereals, doughnuts, etc.) magnifies the risk of coronary heart disease among women, but not men, new research from Italy has found. Looking at data from nearly 48,000 adults, the researchers found that women whose diet had the highest glycemic load were more than twice as likely to develop heart disease. The carbohydrates in low GI foods like vegetables take longer to enter the bloodstream. High GI foods, however, affect blood glucose levels quickly, boosting levels of harmful triglycerides and lowering levels of protective HDL or “good” cholesterol. The researchers suggested that further research is needed to first verify that a high glycemic diet is less dangerous for men than for women, and then to discover why.
Sabina Sieri, Ph.D., Vittorio Krogh, M.D., MS, et al., "Dietary Glycemic Load and Index and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in a Large Italian Cohort", Archives of Internal Medicine, April 12, 2010, © American Medical Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Confectionery
Savory Snacks
Sweet & Savory Spreads
Sweets & Desserts
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Italy

Smaller Kpak Format For Kellogg’s Corn Flakes In India to Expand Reach

April 12, 2010: 04:09 AM EST
Following a test-market launch in Tamil Nadu, Kellogg’s in India is launching nationally the smaller Kpak package format for its Corn Flakes product, following Kpak launches for its Chocos and Honey Loops. The smaller package enables the brand to hit the Rs 10 price point, making it more affordable for the Tier II and III towns, helping it to secure greater market share. Rural areas aren’t yet on Kellogg’s radar as urban centers still provide large potential. Kellogg’s already has a 70 percent share of the relatively small ready-to-eat cereal category in India, and Corn Flakes are also being positioned as an evening snack to help boost out-of-home demand for the product as competition intensifies, with PepsiCo looking to leverage the Quaker platform in India and introduce other breakfast items from its global portfolio, and private label competitors emerging. At the moment, Kellogg’s sees that competition as beneficial by helping to grow the category in the market. It currently offers only breakfast cereal in India and has as yet no plans to introduce some of its other categories.
Seema Sindhu , "Kellogg's goes snacking", Business Standard, April 12, 2010, © Business Standard
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Packaging
Strategy
Pricing
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
India

Indian Scientists Create Transgenic Chicken In Major Breakthrough

April 12, 2010: 02:03 AM EST
A team of Indian scientists has created a transgenic chicken breed that can boost egg production and, they claim, help treat diseases like cancer and AIDS. The Indian transgenic chicken, developed after two years research, uses the gene of jellyfish and spermatozoa of a chicken and is the country’s first accomplishment in genetically-modified poultry, after the development of similar breeds in the U.S., U.K., Canada, and China. Transgenic poultry can produce as much as 300 eggs in 72 weeks, more than double the yield of regular chickens. The senior scientist says the chicken is ready for commercial use but it is not clear if or when it will be available. India still bans the use of GM seeds for food.
ARPAN MUKHERJEE , "India Develops Transgenic Chicken", Wall Street Journal, April 12, 2010, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Innovation
Research
Source & Supply Chain
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
India

Hispanic Spending Buoys Otherwise Stagnant Food And Beverage Industries

April 8, 2010: 12:11 AM EST
Hispanics account for more than 50 percent of the real growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sectors between 2005 and 2008, according to market data from Latinum Network. Inflation-adjusted Hispanic spending totaled $52 billion in that period, outpacing $40 billion of new spending by non-Hispanics. Latinum said the main reasons for the spending boost were the increase in the number of U.S. Hispanic households and an increase in consumer spending among U.S. Hispanics. In the $1 trillion food, beverage and restaurant business, new Hispanic spending more than made up for the decline in demand. Latinum also found that Hispanics created more than $9 billion in new value in otherwise dormant or declining categories such as fish and seafood, fresh fruit juice and dairy products between 2005 and 2008
"U.S. Hispanics Propel Real Growth In Food, Beverage And Restaurant Sectors, According To Latinum Network", Latinum Network, April 08, 2010, © Latinum Network
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Consumers
Market News
Research
Chilled & Deli Food
Packaged Foods & Meats
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Yeo Valley Organic Dairy Range Launched In UAE

April 7, 2010: 09:03 PM EST
Regional organic food maker Alyasra Food Co., (AFC) introduced a range of 100% organic and probiotic yogurt and organic cheese products in the United Arab Emirates. Its Yeo Valley Organic Dairy range is made from 100% organic milk from organic-fed cows in the UK. The launch includes Yeo Valley Low Calorie Yogurt and a line targeted to children, Little Yeo's. Yeo Valley Organic Dairy Range is now available in major supermarkets like Carrefour and Geànt.
"Alyasra Foods introduces the new Yeo Valley Organic Dairy range in the UAE", AMEInfo, April 07, 2010, © AME Info FZ LLC / Emap Limited
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
New Products
Dairy Food
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Middle East- Africa
United Kingdom
United Arab Emirates

Canada Injects $8.3 M Into Pulse Industry To Boost Productivity, Build Markets

April 8, 2010: 08:08 AM EST
Pulse Canada, the industry association that represents growers, processors and traders of pulse crops, will receive an investment of up to $8.3 million from the Canadian government for research, innovation and market development. The idea behind the investment, according to Canada’s Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, is to build a more profitable and competitive pulse industry by helping producers improve productivity and access new markets. The government funding will support a $7 million research project involving industry, government and university scientists to develop improvements in productivity and nutrition, and a $1.3 million market development project to build and support new demand for pulses around the world. In 2009, Canada exported more than $2 billion of pulse products to 150 countries, accounting for about 40 percent of the global pulse trade.
"Government of Canada Helping to Grow Market Opportunities for Pulses", Agriculture and Agri-Food, Canada, April 08, 2010, © Government of Canada
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Policy & Regulation
Source & Supply Chain
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

DuPont Introduces Fish-Free, Vegetarian Omega-3 Supplement In the US

April 8, 2010: 04:51 AM EST
Science-based products and services firm DuPont has introduced the first fish-free Omega-3 supplement in the US under the trademark New Harvest, a vegetarian alternative to fish-based Omega-3 fatty acids. New Harvest has high EPA content that is known to help sustain heart health and aid in keeping cholesterol levels healthy. DuPont has tapped market partner Futurebiotics to distribute New Harvest at select GNC stores. The company believes New Harvest will help Americans increase consumption of Omega-3 that is sourced mainly from fatty fish and nutritional supplements. A new survey indicated that just 10% of Americans eat sufficient fish every week while more than 80% do not consume supplements to meet the recommended intake for Omega-3 fatty acids.
"DuPont Launches New Vegetarian Source of Omega-3 Nutritional Supplements ", PR Web , April 08, 2010, © Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Ingredients
New Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Nutritional Supplement Boosts Stem Cell Production In Clinical Study

April 7, 2010: 07:53 AM EST
A clinical study has found that a commercially-available nutritional supplement kindles the production of stem cells essential for tissue repair. Stem-Kine from Aidan Products increases the blood circulation of hematopoietic stem cells that generate all blood cells and endothelial progenitor cells that repair damage to blood vessels, researchers said. A team of researchers from industry and academia tested the supplement in 18 healthy adults between 20 and 72 years. They ingested the supplement twice a day for two weeks. Researchers tested their blood for stem cell activity and found that the supplement was increased the number of stem cells circulating in the blood. Stem-Kine is a mixture of green tea, astralagus, goji berry extracts, “good” bacteria Lactobacillus fermentum, antioxidant ellagic acid, immune enhancer beta 1,3 glucan and vitamin D3.
Nina A Mikirova, James A Jackson, Ron Hunninghake, Julian Kenyon, et al., "Nutraceutical augmentation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells in human subjects", Journal of Translational Medicine, April 07, 2010, © Journal of Translational Medicine
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
New Products
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Milk Fermented With Probiotics: A New Functional Food Therapy For Gastritis?

April 7, 2010: 09:31 AM EST
Scientists in Argentina have found in animal experiments that using milk fermented with a probiotic effectively treats aspirin-induced gastritis. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) are commonly used to reduce inflammation and pain associated with diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, NSAIDs often cause gastritis in the stomach because they damage mucosal cells. The new research has found that milk fermented with the probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 1190 eases chronic gastritis by adjusting the immune response and by thickening the gastric mucus gel layer. The researchers concluded: “Fermented milk with S. thermophilus CRL 1190 … could be used in novel functional foods as an alternative natural therapy for chronic gastritis induced by acetylsalicylic acid.”
Cecilia Rodríguez, Marta Medici, Fernanda Mozzi and Graciela Font de Valdez, "Therapeutic effect of Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 1190-fermented milk on chronic gastritis", World Journal of Gastroenterology, April 07, 2010, © Baishideng
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Dairy Food
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
Latin America
Argentina

Science Makes Headway In Search For Treatment For “Sleep Eating” Disorder

April 7, 2010: 03:58 AM EST
Sleep eaters, who account for about one percent of adults suffering from sleep disorders, have a tendency to binge on sugary, high-calorie snacks during the night, all while in a sleepy stupor. The harmful consequences of the disorder, according to experts, can include injuries like black eyes from walking into walls, hand cuts from using kitchen knives, and even dental damage from trying to eat frozen food. On a psychological level, sleep eaters often experience depression, frustration and shame, and may also suffer from binge eating and anorexia. Recent research has begun to shed some light on the biochemical underpinnings for sleep eating, however, and has even pinpointed some possible treatments. Among these are topiramate (Topamax), currently used to treat epilepsy, and drugs that boost dopamine levels.
RANDI HUTTER EPSTEIN, "Raiding the Refrigerator, but Still Asleep", NY Times, April 07, 2010, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Research
Confectionery
Sweets & Desserts
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Unilever Takes Tough Stance With Palm Oil Producer, PT Smart

April 7, 2010: 01:45 AM EST
The world’s largest palm oil buyer Unilever, will only resume purchasing palm oil from PT Smart, a Sinar Mas subsidiary, if the company is cleared after an investigation over allegations of illegal practices, or shows it has taken steps to ensure it is a sustainable provider. According to a Greenpeace report, Sinar Mas, Indonesia’s top producer of palm oil, is responsible for “widespread deforestation and peatland clearance” which contributes to increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the devastation of rain forests. This led Unilever to cancel their $32 million yearly contract with Sinar Mas. Unilever and PT Smart together appointed two independent auditors, Control Union Certification and British Standard institute, to investigate validity of the environmental allegations. Nestlé, another palm oil buyer, has stopped buying from Sinar Mas while Cargill, a large agribusiness company, is threatening to remove the company from their supplier list due to the allegations.
Yayat Supriatna , "Unilever to resume buying CPO if Sinar Mas cleared", Reuters, April 07, 2010, © Thomson Reuters
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Source & Supply Chain
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Indonesia

Study Finds No Link Between MSG Intake And Weight Gain

April 7, 2010: 02:29 AM EST
A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition suggests monosodium glutamate (MSG) is not associated with significant weight gain. The study looked into a possible link between increased MSG intake and obesity over a five year period, assessing MSG consumption and body weight of 1282 Chinese men and women in 2002 and again in 2007. After controlling for other factors - age, sex, lifestyle factors and energy intake – the study found no link between MSG intake and weight gain.
Shi Z, Luscombe-Marsh ND, Wittert GA, Yuan B, Dai Y, Pan X, Taylor AW., "Monosodium glutamate is not associated with obesity or a greater prevalence of weight gain over 5 years: findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese adults.", British Journal of Nutrition, April 07, 2010, © Cambridge University Press
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Ingredients
Research
Cooking Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Australia
China

UK Ingredient Developer To Introduce Sweet Potato Starch, Enable Cleaner Labels

April 6, 2010: 04:39 AM EST
UK-based ingredient developer Ulrick & Short and its Brazilian partners are to introduce sweet potato starch, which is more costly than standard potato starch but cheaper than the waxy maize variety. It is also non genetically-modified, a main consideration for European buyers. The product will enable manufacturers to have cleaner labels without the presence of undesirable ingredients listed. It will be the first functional clean-label starch from sweet potato and will have superior smoothness and body suited to higher value products such as soups, sauces, and ready meals. Ulrick & Short, posted 18% growth this year driven by clean-label ingredients, and is again focusing on premium products even as the recession prompted cost-cutting and use of value ingredients.
Elaine Watson, "Ulrick & Short scores with sweet potato starch", Food Manufacture, UK, April 06, 2010, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
New Products
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Latin America
Europe
Brazil
United Kingdom

New EFSA Health Claims Rules Already Having A Major Impact On H&W Food Industry

April 7, 2010: 12:05 AM EST
A new Euromonitor report finds that the European Food Safety Authority’s new regulatory process for evaluating food label health claims is having a major impact on the health and wellness food and beverage market in the EU as manufacturers hurry to reformulate and resubmit claims before the final deadline. The stakes are high, mainly because regulatory approval opens the door to the potentially $203 billion market. And while the report suggests that the new regulatory process may slow R&D investment, it could help entrenched players by making it prohibitively expensive for start-ups to enter the market. Euromonitor also found that health claims on food labels have shifted away from general functionality and nutritional benefits toward treating specific diseases or disorders.
"New Euromonitor Report Discusses Impact of EFSA’s Health Claim Legislation ", Nutraceuticals World, April 07, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Ingredients
Packaging
Policy & Regulation
Safety
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Strong Sales Of Mini-Cakes And Biscuits Keep Convenience Store Owners Happy

April 6, 2010: 04:05 AM EST
The whole cakes market may have ground to a halt, thanks to the trend toward smaller households, but the public’s appetite for cake has not diminished. It has simply swung toward bite-size cakes, whose sales at convenience stores have picked up considerably in recent years. Baking companies are now offering various “eat now'” mini-cakes, including a few mixed with brand name candies like M&Ms Chocolate Brownies and Mars Muffins, as well as small-portion cakes that can be packed into lunch boxes. Biscuit sales, too, are growing at convenience stores, even in an era of economic uncertainty and greater consumer concern for health. "People are interested in their health,” says a biscuit maker, “but there'll always be a desire for them to treat themselves.”
"Oh, crumbs: biscuits take the cake", Convenience Store, April 06, 2010, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Innovation
Market News
Research
Retail
Strategy
Private Label
Bakery & Cereals
Confectionery
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Baking Companies Look To Enhance Product Lines With Fiber, Ancient Grains

April 5, 2010: 11:35 PM EST
Baking companies have met increased consumer demand for nutritious baked goods by boosting fiber content, cutting calories, and replacing unhealthy fats with healthier ones, like omega-3s. But bakers are also moving in other apparently healthy directions, testing advanced forms of fiber, as well as nontraditional and “ancient” grains in products targeted at consumers who want to (or have to) avoid wheat and gluten, or who simply want to experiment with something new, different and healthy. Two fibers that are growing in popularity among bakers are inulin, a natural starch, and resistant starch, which avoids being digested and thus acts like fiber in the colon. As to ancient grains, bakers are toying with such unfamiliar flours as amaranth, millet, quinoa, sorghum and teff, offered individually and as custom blends.
Mark Anthony, "Food Processors Working to Produce Healthier Baked Goods", FoodProcessing.com, April 05, 2010, © Food Processing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Consumers
Ingredients
Source & Supply Chain
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

High-Protein Diet Spurs Safer Weight Loss Among “Combative” Athletes

April 5, 2010: 09:31 AM EST
Athletes who participate in so-called “combative” sports often resort to harmful weight-loss measures to reach weight class goals, including starvation diets, sauna suits, etc. But new US research has found that participants in mixed martial arts, wrestling and boxing can lose weight quickly without jeopardizing their health. The key is eating a high-protein diet customized for a person’s weight class, and eating several meals a day, rather than one meal, which can be hazardous to health. The high-protein diet technique was tested among soldiers and Air Force cadets who trained at Kansas State University in combatives, which combine submission wrestling with elements of kickboxing and mixed martial arts. The protein diet sparked weight loss, did not negatively affect athletic performance and helped increase lean muscle mass.
Jen Case & Mark Haub, "High-Protein Diet Can Help Athletes in Sports Like Mixed Martial Arts Meet Weight Class Goals without Endangering Health", News release, Kansas State University, April 05, 2010, via Newswise, © Kansas State University
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Consumer Group Urges FDA To Act On “Slack Fill”

April 5, 2010: 05:50 AM EST
The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CPSI), a US nutrition and food consumer group, is calling for the Food and Drug Administration to stop food companies selling food packages that contain a large proportion of air, a practice known as “slack fill”. Federal rules already exist to restrict slack fill to situations where air in the package is unavoidable – through settlement or to help protect the contents – but the CPSI believes that manufacturers are using it as a trick to make consumers think they are getting more for their money. The watchdog also argues that slack fill has an environmental cost, unnecessarily taking up space in shipping containers and trucks.
"CSPI Calls on FDA, State Attorneys General to Crack Down on “Slack Fill”", Center for Science in the Public Interest, April 05, 2010, © Center for Science in the Public Interest
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Packaging
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Organic Food Market In India Withstands Inflation And Recession

April 2, 2010: 10:52 PM EST
Organic food in India looks to have managed continuous growth last year despite the economic recession, price inflation and the fact that that it is priced up to 80% higher than regular food products. Organic retailers in Chennai, Bangalore and Hyderabad disclosed a growth of more than 20% while a chain of organic food establishments in New Delhi, Mumbai, and Dehradun did not report any slowdown. Also in Chennai, another organic store continues to serve a hundred customers daily. Organic food accounts for less than 5% of India’s food market and is typically purchased by wealthier consumers that can still afford to pay a premium, largely shielding the market.
Swati Anand, "Inflation no worry for organic food", Times of India, April 02, 2010, © Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Market News
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
India

Anti-Inflammatory Dietary Supplements May Prevent Diseases Caused By Obesity

April 1, 2010: 11:28 PM EST
Scientists in the Netherlands applying the principles of nutrigenomics have found that a carefully compiled dietary cocktail of anti-inflammatory compounds had a positive impact on inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism, and could prevent diseases associated with being overweight or obese. In a placebo-controlled five-week clinical trial , scientists at a Dutch research organization gave 36 overweight men daily doses of substances known to have some anti-inflammatory effect: resveratrol, green tea extract, vitamin E, vitamin C, fish oil and tomato extract. According to the study, which analyzed gene expression, proteins, and metabolites, the additives reduced the inflammation of fatty tissue, improved vascular wall function and increased degradation of fats in the liver, indicating that a nutrigenomics approach could be effective in thwarting obesity-related disorders and diseases.
Gertruud CM Bakker, Marjan J van Erk, Linette Pellis, Suzan Wopereis, Carina M Rubingh, Nicole HP Cnubben, Teake Kooistra, Ben van Ommen and Henk FJ Hendriks , "An antiinflammatory dietary mix modulates inflammation and oxidative and metabolic stress in overweight men: a nutrigenomics approach", Journal of the American Dietetic Association, April 01, 2010, © The American Society for Nutrition
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Netherlands

Digestive Health Tops List Of Key Food, Nutrition, Health Trends Of 2010

April 1, 2010: 07:27 AM EST
The biggest trend in food, nutrition and health in 2010, and still a major growth opportunity globally in spite of the recession, is digestive health, as evidenced by notable growth rates of digestive health products, including premium brands, according to industry expert Julian Mellentin. Huge areas of unexploited market potential still exist, Mellentin says, especially for fiber fortified foods, as well as beverages and cereals. Also gathering momentum is the so-called “bones and movement” category: products that address bone and joint health among the growing over-40 population. Other key trends highlighted by Mellentin include: fruits and superfruits, antioxidants, weight management, healthy snacking, and packaging and “premiumisation.” Micro-trends include: protein power, kids’ nutrition, probiotics, omega-3 and the “ultra-niche opportunity” beauty.
"10 Key Trends in Food, Nutrition & Health 2010 ", just-food, April 01, 2010, © just-food.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Research
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Fruit & Vegetables
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
Europe
United Kingdom

In An April 1 Ploy, Lloyd’s Of London Insures Nestlé’s Butterfinger Candy Bar For $1 Million

April 1, 2010: 10:29 PM EST
In a release dated April 1, Nestlé USA announced it had purchased a $1-million insurance policy for Butterfinger through Lloyd’s of London to ensure the ‘ongoing production’ of the peanut-flavored candy bar and to underline the promise of the brand’s tagline “Nobody’s Gonna Lay A Finger On My Butterfinger!” The tongue in check release said Nestlé USA was aware of consumer desire for Butterfinger and had secured the million-dollar protection. It also established the Butterfinger Bar Insurance program that will issue replacement bars to the first 100,000 consumers who file online a claim that “someone else laid a finger” on their Butterfinger. A coupon will be mailed to those who will redeem their candy bars at Butterfinger.com/BarInsurance. Consumers can also submit their bar theft stories online to win prizes.
"$1 MILLION INSURANCE POLICY SECURED FOR BUTTERFINGER® WITH LLOYD’S OF LONDON", PRNewswire US, April 01, 2010, © PR Newswire Association LLC/Nestlé USA
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Confectionery
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Simple Test Developed To Detect Hazardous Food Contaminant Melamine

April 1, 2010: 09:51 AM EST
Melamine – an industrial compound used in plastics and fertilizers and found in 2008 in tainted dairy products from China – sickened thousands of people, especially children, leading to a global recall of Chinese dairy products. High in nitrogen, melamine was added to foods to make them appear higher in protein value during testing. To combat the problem, US researchers have developed a quick, cheap and simple way to detect melamine in milk. The new method uses gold nanoparticles and a dual color and precipitation test that takes less than 15 minutes, according to the researchers. The interaction between the gold nanoparticles and melamine causes a dramatic color change. The researchers hope to develop a simple commercial kit that can be used by anyone, anywhere to detect melamine in food.
Fang Wei, Robert Lam, Stacy Cheng, Steven Lu, Dean Ho, and Na Li, "Rapid Detection of Melamine in Whole Milk Mediated by Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles", Applied Physics Letters, April 01, 2010, © American Institute of Physics
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Safety
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
China

Health Benefits Of Whole Grain Diet Outlined In Australian Report

April 1, 2010: 08:07 AM EST
A new report from Australian researchers lays out the abundant scientific evidence that whole grains and legumes play a major role in shielding the human body from cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and obesity. Australia does not currently make official recommendations for the consumption of whole grains, though the government has urged that Australians eat a minimum of four servings of grain-based foods a day. The report says research has found that consuming two to four servings of whole grain foods each day could cut the risk of heart disease by 40 percent. In addition, a whole grains-based diet may help reduce blood pressure, lower body mass index and the risk of obesity, and may play a role in preventing periodontal disease and asthma.
Go Grains Health and Nutrition and Associate Prof. Peter Williams, Univ. of Wollongong, "The Grains and Legumes Health Report", Go Grains, April 01, 2010, © Go Grains Health & Nutrition Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Bakers Are Carefully Reformulating Products To Meet Demand For Whole Grains

April 1, 2010: 08:19 AM EST
Bakers are successfully meeting a major challenge leveled at them by health-conscious consumers: provide fiber-filled whole grain options that are also light and savory. So far the response has been built around substituting – albeit gradually – whole grains for white flour in products. The trend has expanded beyond breads to include whole grain croissants, crackers, bagels and pizza crust that have the appearance, texture and flavor that consumers are used to. The trick so far has been the use of specially processed “white wheat” that packs the range of vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, etc., of whole wheat products but not the bitter whole meal taste. The key to successfully formulating whole grain baked goods? Remembering that whole grains absorb more water than white flour, but at a slower rate.
Jean Thilmany , "Going whole grain", Baking management, April 01, 2010, © Penton Media, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Innovation
Research
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

UK Policymakers Take Note: Organic Business Is On The Mend

April 1, 2010: 04:21 AM EST
According to a report by the UK’s Soil Association, organic business, like all other business, has felt the recession’s negative impact. But there is cause for optimism. Overall, organic sales may have dropped 13 percent, but organic milk and baby food sales defied the trend, posting increases of one percent and 20.8 percent respectively. Organic health and beauty product sales soared by 33 percent to $55 million. Organic farmland increased by nine percent over 2008. Organic sales show a possibility of “modest growth” (two to five percent) this year. But more work needs to be done. In particular, lawmakers need to be reminded of the environmental benefits of organic farming: converting all UK farmland to organic production would have the same environmental impact as taking a million cars off the road.
"Organic Market Report 2010", Soil Association, April 01, 2010, © Soil Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
Policy & Regulation
Research
Trends
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

US EPA Adds BPA To Chemical Concern List, Possible Impact On Food Packaging

March 28, 2010: 11:36 PM EST
US-based Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will investigate the potential harmful effects of chemical bisphenol A (BPA) on human health and the environment. BPA, widely used in the manufacture of consumer and industrial products, is believed to have adverse effects on animal reproduction and development as well as the endocrine system. The US Food and Drug Administration previously raised concerns about BPA’s potential impacts, adding it would look at ways to cut BPA exposure in food packaging. EPA will investigate BPA’s effect on water supply and on growth, reproduction, and development of aquatic organisms and wildlife. EPA will also include BPA in its chemical concern list. EPA is authorized under the Toxic Substances Control Act to list chemicals that may present an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the environment.
"EPA to Scrutinize Environmental Impact of Bisphenol A", EPA, March 28, 2010, ©
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Packaging
Policy & Regulation
Research
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Insights From Consumer Research Push Ball Park Hot Dogs To Market Leadership

March 28, 2010: 10:37 PM EST
It was no accident that Sara Lee’s Ball Park hot dog brand became the market leader in 2009, usurping Oscar Mayer. Top marketers paid close attention to research that uncovered some intriguing insights. For example, moms were the primary buyers of the product, but teenage boys were the ones eating it. So the approach had to be two-pronged: appeal to moms looking for a healthy, fast and convenient hot dog for teenage sons and husbands, and appeal to teens themselves. Sara Lee subsequently allotted 70 percent of ad spending to moms, and the other 30 percent to teenage boys (mainly gaming and online action sports sites). It also took advantage of the existence of consumers passionate enough about deli foods. The company is now an active participant in social media sites.
Elaine Wong, "How Sara Lee's Ball Park Brand Became the Top Dog", Brandweek, March 28, 2010, © Brandweek
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Research
Strategy
Advertising
Chilled & Deli Food
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

UK FSA Recommends Food Firms To Make Sweet Foods Healthier; Smaller Servings

March 26, 2010: 06:47 AM EST
UK-based Food Standards Agency wants food companies to cut saturated fat and added sugar in popular sweets and make smaller food servings accessible to help improve public health. The agency issued recommendations calling on the UK food industry to modify food ingredients and reduce portion sizes of foods to help deliver real public health benefits. It specially called for reduction of saturated fat levels in some chocolate confectionery (bars with fillings) by at least 10%; in plain sweet and savory biscuits, and plain cakes by at least 10%; and 5% in non-plain biscuits and cakes. It added that soft drinks containing added sugar should be made readily available in single portion sizes of 250ml. The agency said it will soon come out with recommendations on dairy and meat products, pastry and savory snacks.
"Agency makes recommendations on reducing saturated fat and added sugar in key sweet foods", Food Standards Agency, March 26, 2010, © Crown
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Policy & Regulation
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Confectionery
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Food Scientists Making Progress In Quest To Enhance Fiber Content

March 25, 2010: 02:06 AM EST
With the market for dietary fiber expected to top $495 million by 2011, and growing annually by 14.2 percent thanks to government and nutritionist health recommendations, it’s no wonder many food companies are looking for ways to include or boost fiber in foods and beverages. The challenge for food processors is that available dietary fibers behave differently in food processing, depending on the chemistry of the fiber and the desired end product characteristics. Inulin, the most commonly used fiber today, is easy to work with, lacks noticeable taste or texture, and is extremely fiber-dense. But food formulators eager to hike fiber content face technical problems: how to pack more than five grams of fiber into a single serving? The answer: multi-fiber blends, which can nearly double fiber content while keeping mouthfeel and taste.
Kimberly J. Decker, "A New Look at Fiber Fortification", Food Product Design, March 25, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Functional Foods
Packaged Foods & Meats
Ready Meals
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Can PepsiCo Transform Itself From Purveyor Of Salt, Fat And Sugar?

March 25, 2010: 03:38 AM EST
PepsiCo faces a three-front war: enhancing company financial performance, staying a step ahead of government agencies determined to “regulate” an end to the obesity epidemic, and holding onto the brand loyalty of customers who don’t care a fig about sugar, salt or fat content. To fend off the regulators, Pepsi has announced several long-term deadlines for cutting unhealthy ingredients. On the financial front, investors seem willing to look past the company’s lackluster 2009 performance, now that it has hiked the dividend, implemented a share buyback, taken steps toward cross-marketing snacks and beverages, and launched strategic marketing and supply partnerships. Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether consumer, government and other skeptics will be able to swallow a marketing strategy that dwells somewhat equally on healthy and unhealthy products.
"Pepsi gets a makeover", The Economist print edition , March 25, 2010, © The Economist Newspaper Limited
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
Policy & Regulation
Strategy
Savory Snacks
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Scientists Find Significant Evidence Of Anticancer Role For Vitamin K2

March 24, 2010: 09:51 PM EST
A European study of aggregate health data focusing on the health benefits of foods rich in of vitamin K found that consuming vitamin K2 seems to reduce the risk of cancer. K2, known as menaquinone, was associated with a 30 percent reduction in illnesses and deaths from cancer, the study demonstrated. However, Vitamin K1, or phylloquinone, did not offer the same anticarcinogenic benefit. Leafy green vegetables like lettuce, broccoli and spinach are the primary sources of K1 in Western diets, while K2 is found in certain meats and cheeses and also synthesized by various microorganisms in the intestines. The study examined data on 24,340 people aged 35–64 years and cancer-free at enrollment (1994 –1998). Follow-up through 2008 found 1,755 cancer cases, 458 of which were fatal.
Katharina Nimptsch, Sabine Rohrmann, Rudolf Kaaks and Jakob Linseisen, "Dietary vitamin K intake in relation to cancer incidence and mortality: results from the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Heidelberg)", The American Society for Nutrition, March 24, 2010, © The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Dairy Food
Fruit & Vegetables
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Germany

Italian Chocolate Maker ICAM Expands Private Label Manufacturing Business In N. America

March 23, 2010: 10:30 PM EST
With U.S. consumers now “very sensitive to chocolate product quality,” ICAM (Lecco, Italy) hopes to boost its North American private label chocolate making business with a Los Angeles sales office operating under the Agostini Chocolate brand. The U.S. sales team will offer North American retailers and consumer brand companies an array of different stock and custom choices for developing premium chocolate products. Noting that American retailers are selling a lot of premium organically-produced chocolates from ”unique cocoa origins,” ICAM believes its high quality, organic, chocolate products produced from single origin and Fair Trade cocoa beans will flourish. The Agostini factory, which produced almost 7,000 tons of private label products in 2009, has strong Equal Partner relationships with key cocoa producing countries Ecuador, Peru and the Dominican Republic.
"Agostoni Private Label Chocolate Now in U.S.", Natural Products Marketplace, March 23, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Market News
Retail
Source & Supply Chain
Strategy
Private Label
Confectionery
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Latin America
United States of America
Europe
Ecuador
Peru
Italy

Risk Of Coronary Heart Disease Is Reduced By Consumption Of Polyunsaturated Fats

March 23, 2010: 11:17 PM EST
Over the past twenty or thirty years, the food industry has cut back on the use of saturated fat, while consumers have cut back commensurately in their diets. Other nutrients were substituted for those saturated fats: now-taboo trans fats were used in processed foods, and refined carbohydrates and grains were consumed in everyday diets. Neither were optimal replacements, according to new U.S. research that gathered data from a large number of online study databases, scientific articles and clinical trial reports. The researchers found that people who replaced saturated fat in their diet with polyunsaturated fat reduced their risk of coronary heart disease by 19 percent, compared with people who did not. In fact, for every five percent increase in polyunsaturated fat consumption, coronary heart disease risk was slashed ten percent.
Dariush Mozaffarian, Renata Micha, Sarah Wallace, "Effects on Coronary Heart Disease of Increasing Polyunsaturated Fat in Place of Saturated Fat: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials", PLOS Medicine, March 23, 2010, © Mozaffarian et al.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Canadian Health Survey Finds Four Percent Of Population Is Vitamin D Deficient

March 23, 2010: 11:03 PM EST
An analysis of data collected from a national sample of Canadians who participated in a health measures survey found that about four percent of Canadians aged 6 to 79 are vitamin D-deficient. In addition, more than ten percent had vitamin D concentrations in their blood that were inadequate for bone health. The scientists who examined the data discovered that “low milk consumption and non-white racial background” were significantly associated with lower blood plasma concentrations of vitamin D. The national survey analyzed blood and urine samples from Canadians for chronic and infectious diseases, environmental toxins and nutritional biomarkers, including glucose, cholesterol, calcium, and vitamin D.
Kellie Langlois, Linda Greene-Finestone, Julian Little, Nick Hidiroglou and Susan Whiting, "Vitamin D status of Canadians as measured in the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey", Statistics Canada, March 23, 2010, © Statistics Canada
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Dairy Food
Fish & Fish Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

PepsiCo Set To Launch New Lay’s Chip Version Using Lower-Sodium Salt

March 22, 2010: 03:58 AM EST
With the U.S. food industry under increasing governmental and consumer pressure to lower sodium content in products, companies have been scrambling to find a technological solution that preserves flavor. PepsiCo Inc. apparently is leading this movement: it plans to launch a new version of Lay's potato chips with a lower-sodium salt. The new crystal structure of the salt – it’s more powdery – cuts the sodium content by 25 percent. Still in the testing phase, the salt could end up in other chip products, including seasoned versions, and in products like Cheetos and Quaker bars. Working closely with academic and company scientists in Europe and the U.S., PepsiCo found what it wanted – a salt that delivers a burst of salty flavor followed by a body of flavor and lingering sensation.
BETSY MCKAY , "PepsiCo Develops 'Designer Salt' to Chip Away at Sodium Intake", Wall Street Journal, March 22, 2010, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
New Products
Research
Strategy
Savory Snacks
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

More Research Needed To Determine Health Benefits Of Coconut-Milk Products

March 22, 2010: 03:41 AM EST
Newly developed coconut-milk drinks may be lower in overall calories than their much-maligned ancestors from the 1980s, but they still contain a lot of saturated fat. However, according to makers of the beverages, scientific studies have shown that the sat-fats they contain, known as MCFAs, speed up metabolism and promote weight loss. The claims are being tested, and so far are unproven. At the same time scientists are examining evidence that MCFAs increase cholesterol levels, including the so-called bad cholesterol LDL, and may be harmful to health. Consumers need to be careful because coconut-milk drinks are far from being considered a health food, despite the preliminary research into weight loss benefits. Bottom line: much more study is needed to confirm whether coconut-milk products are helpful -- or harmful -- to health.
Elena Conis, "Got coconut milk?", Los Angeles Times, March 22, 2010, © The Los Angeles Times
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Cooking Ingredients
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Canada
Europe
Italy
Switzerland

Australian Cereal And Bread Makers Agree To Cut Salt Content

March 22, 2010: 03:59 AM EST
Leading Australian cereal and bread makers have agreed with the government to reduce salt content in their products gradually over the next three to four years. Participants in a “dialogue” convened by government health authorities and a group representing the food industry settled on a sodium target of 400 milligrams per 100 grams for ready to eat cereals, breads, rolls and buns. Cereal makers Kellogg’s, Sanitarium, etc., set a target date of 2014, while bread manufacturers George Weston Foods, Goodman Fielder Baking and others agreed on 2013. An official of the industry group noted that George Weston had already removed 342 tons of salt from products since 2009, despite technical challenges, and other food companies were looking to reduce salt in “processed meats, soups, sauces and snack foods.”
"AUS: Bread, cereal makers target reduced salt", Just-food, March 22, 2010, © just-food.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Strategy
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Australia

Food Industry Embraces Food Additives, Thanks To Scientific Advancements

March 22, 2010: 04:14 AM EST
The diversity and quantity of fortified food products have grown dramatically in the last five years, thanks to advancements in additive science that have solved problems like objectionable flavors and odors, and made formulation easier. Formulation now requires less effort thanks to new matrices. Spray drying, for example, produces a starch matrix that enhances the fat solubility of vitamins A,D, E and K in water- and juice-based foods. And lipid encapsulation has made possible better tasting, healthier meal-replacement bars. The trendiest additives in the last five years? Vitamins C and E, thanks to their recognized antioxidant – and possibly cancer-prevention – properties; biotin, which has become a common ingredient in hair and skin care products; and inulin, now regularly used in vitamin-mineral premixes to boost food fiber content.
Vanessa Teter, "Food Fortification Trends", Natural Products Insider, March 22, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Innovation
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Dairy Food
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Natural Soups, 3-Ply Bath Tissue Top NRI’s Lists Of Successful ‘09 Product Launches

March 22, 2010: 10:47 PM EST
Despite an uncertain economy in which consumers paid very close attention to what ended up ion their shopping carts, many companies were able to successfully introduce new food and non-food products in 2009. Information Resources, Inc., kept track of them, compiling two top-ten lists ranked by sales. The biggest achiever in the food category was Campbell’s Prize Harvest line of “100 percent natural” soups, a marketing coup after the company finally figured out how to touch base with its primary demo. Filling out the top five winners in the food category were Bud Light Lime from Anheuser-Busch, Green Giant Valley Fresh Steamers, Arnold Select Sandwich Thins and Dreyer’s/Edy’s Fun Flavors ice cream. King of the hill in the non-food category? Georgia-Pacific’s Quilted Northern Ultra Plush, the first three-ply bath tissue introduced in the U.S. market.
Elaine Wong and Todd Wasserman, "IRI's Top Launches of 2009", Brandweek, March 22, 2010, © Brandweek
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
Market News
New Products
Research
Strategy
Advertising
Bakery & Cereals
Natural and Organic
Soup
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Despite Some Daunting Obstacles, Opportunities For Nutritional Product Marketers Are Plentiful

March 22, 2010: 02:22 AM EST
Opportunities abound for nutritional product marketers – some researchers forecast the functional food market to top $43 billion by 2013 – as consumers increasingly focus on the health benefits of the foods they consume. But marketers in the US and abroad face a number of challenges, external and internal, in getting their message across to those health-conscious consumers. These include pressures from ever more restrictive government regulators, consumer advocates, and environmentalists. Internally, functional food companies need to establish their position in the emerging industry by cultivating and educating niche-market customers. But before that happens, they need to educate themselves on the marketing opportunities provided by high-profile nutritional ingredients (antioxidants, fiber, omega-3s, probiotics, calcium, etc.). One such opportunity: the US FDA has been easing restrictions on product claims related to cancer risk reduction.
Claudia Dziuk O’Donnell, "NUTRITIONAL Product Opportunities", Prepared Foods, Nutra Solutions, March 22, 2010, © BNP Media
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Policy & Regulation
Research
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe

USDA Says Bush-Era Federal Organic Food Overseer Failed To Enforce Standards

March 22, 2010: 03:04 AM EST
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Inspector General has severely criticized the National Organic Program (NOP), a unit of the Agricultural Marketing Service that ensures accurate labeling of organic food, for failure to enforce standards under the Bush administration. Between 2006 and 2008 the NOP did not respond quickly or effectively to investigations into five certified organic operations, including one that had marketed non-organic mint under USDA’s organic label for two years. In addition, the NOP allowed California to create a state organic program that, as of last November, failed to meet national requirements. The USDA stressed that NOP needed to improve administration, bolster control over certifying agents, better enforce regulations, resolve complaints quickly, and make sure organic products meet standards.
just-food, "US organic food enforcement slammed", Australian Food News, March 22, 2010, © Australian Food News
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Carbery Unveils Food Ingredient That Blends WheyProtein And Omega-3

March 22, 2010: 02:55 AM EST
After what it called “extensive development work,” Irish ingredients supplier Carbery has introduced a product combining whey protein concentrate (WPC) and omega-3 fatty acids with “good mouthfeel and texture.” The ingredient provides levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and ALA (alpha-linoleic acid) that make foods eligible to use “source of” and “high in” omega-3 label claims in compliance with revised European Union regulations. The new ingredient -- part of Carbery’s Carbelec product line containing whey concentrates with up to 80 percent protein -- targets the meal replacement, clinical nutrition and low calorie diet markets, where “consumers need an easy way to meet daily nutritional guidelines and support health,” a Carbery executive said. Israeli researchers were the first to discover that whey protein could be a nano-vehicle for delivering DHA.
Shane Starling, "Carbery Launches Whey-Omega-3 Blend", American Dairy Products Institute, March 22, 2010, © American Dairy Products Institute
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
Middle East- Africa
United Kingdom
Ireland
Israel

7-Eleven U.S. To Develop Low-Priced Foods For Hispanic Market

March 22, 2010: 03:54 AM EST
The U.S.-based unit of 7-Eleven is once again attempting to take advantage of economies of scale by linking up with its Mexican counterpart to create lower-priced private label foods targeting Hispanic customers. The company hopes the partnership will create enough purchasing clout to reduce costs and, in turn, prices. "It is important to get the best cost possible and offer the customer the best price," a 7-Eleven spokeswoman said. Partnerships that exploit economies of scale to create cost-saving opportunities are not new to the U.S. unit of 7-Eleven. Last year it pooled resources with its Tokyo-based parent company to market two new low-price wines.
"7-Eleven Develops Private Label Products for Hispanics ", Convenience Store News, March 22, 2010, © Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Market News
New Products
Retail
Strategy
Private Label
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Mexico
Japan

Microscopic Crystals Help UK’s Bakers Cut Salt Content, But Not Product Quality

March 22, 2010: 02:47 AM EST
The UK’s top baking companies are getting ready to launch new products with sodium levels slashed by as much as half – from 1.8 percent to .7 percent – thanks to microscopic salt crystals that have no impact on volume, texture or weight. Emanate, the company providing the tiny crystals, says the technology is based on the principle that the smaller the salt crystal, the greater the perception of salt, so less is needed. The company overcame technical hurdles – simply grinding the salt finer didn’t work because the crystals stick together – using an innovative process that alters crystal structure. Crystals become free-flowing hollow balls with a shelf-life of 18 months, an Emanate exec said. Bakers are satisfied with the result: new products, albeit more expensive, could hit store shelves in early 2011.
Elaine Watson, "Bakers slash salt with ‘micro’ salt particles", Food Manufacture, March 22, 2010, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
Research
Strategy
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Americans Respond Better To Food Labels Suggesting “Natural” Ingredients

March 22, 2010: 03:19 AM EST
Labeling foods with the claims “antioxidant added” or “omega-3 added” fails to push the purchasing buttons of American shoppers, who seem to equate the term “added” with “less natural” and “more processed,” according to a new Decision Analyst survey. The label that resonates is “rich in:” 40 percent of American consumers were more likely to buy foods labeled, for example, “rich in antioxidants,” compared to 25 percent attracted by “antioxidants added.” The same held true for other ingredients: 27 percent preferred “rich in omega-3s” (19 percent chose “omega-3s added) and 25 percent preferred “rich in iron” (15 percent chose “iron added”). “Consumer perceptions and beliefs about ingredients, as well as nutritional information on food packaging, are important factors driving their purchase behavior,” the analyst added.
"Foods Labeled As “Rich In Antioxidants” Resonate More With American Consumers Than Foods Labeled “Antioxidants Added,” According To A Nationwide Study By Decision Analyst", Decision Analyst, March 22, 2010, © Decision Analyst, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Brands & Marketing
Ingredients
Research
Advertising
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Natural Stabilizers Can Help Food Products Be More Natural

March 22, 2010: 04:35 AM EST
Although people are eating at home more often than before, they aren’t always starting from basics, but are using prepared ingredients. They seek value-for-money, but also demand convenience and products that meet their expectations for health and wellness, such as “all natural”. Many of the items they use for cooking require stabilizers to improve the product and its shelf-life, but whether or not the stabilizers are natural is a gray area, and it’s difficult for consumers to determine this from product labels. The FDA labels no stabilizers natural, but those significantly changed from their original form are deemed “unnatural”. Carbohydrates like starch are often used as stabilizers and are sourced directly from natural raw materials. Most authorities would regard it as a natural stabilizer if it isn’t chemically modified or blended with non-natural material. Some countries would only consider as natural stabilizers from physical extraction (such as “grinding, milling, sieving and dehydration”), where the chemical structure of the ingredient is unmodified. Examples include guar gum. If the raw material is soaked in hot water, for example, or a solvent is used, and there is resultant change in structure, or small quantities of solvent remain, ingredient could be rendered unnatural in the view of some authorities, but not all. A number of proteins can be used as stabilizers, such as gelatin. The process of converting raw material into edible gelatin is complex, but it’s also primarily a physical process and considered to be natural. Milk and whey proteins are also used as natural stabilizers, and they contribute to the food nutritionally. Eggs, for example, are ideal all-natural stabilizers for ice cream: the new Häagen-Dazs Five range uses just five ingredients - milk, cream, sugar, eggs and one a flavoring ingredient. Diana Briceno, marketing manager, wholesome ingredients, National Starch Food Innovation, Bridgewater, NJ, says: “Consumers are more interested in natural than ever before, so there is definitely a growing demand for natural stabilizers”.
Donna Berry, "Stabilization From Nature", Food Product Design, March 22, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Market News
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<166167168169170171172173174175>> Total results:9330 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.