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Cocoa Found To Reduce Heart Disease-Related Inflammation

October 23, 2009: 01:24 AM EST
A diet featuring daily intake of unsweetened cocoa powder reduced inflammatory markers associated with heart disease in a one-month Spanish study of 42 men and women whose average age was 70 and were at high risk of cardiovascular disease because of smoking, high blood pressure, etc. Inflammatory markers cause white blood cells to adhere to artery walls causing atherosclerotic plaques. The diet included 1.4 oz. of cocoa mixed with skim milk. A control group drank only skim milk. But, an expert cautioned, cocoa should be “a part of a healthful eating plan, not a magic bullet for reducing inflammation."
Maria Monagas, Nasiruddin Khan, et al., "Effect of cocoa powder on the modulation of inflammatory biomarkers in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease", American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 23, 2009, © American Society for Clinical Nutrition
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ConAgra Touts Nutritious Vegetable Content Of Manwich

October 23, 2009: 03:49 AM EST
ConAgra has decided to publicize what was apparently a long-held secret – namely, that its Manwich brand contains a full serving of vegetables and is therefore more nutritious than people once thought. The company learned in consumer focus groups that hardly anyone was aware of the veggie content of Manwich, which has always been pitched as more of a meal than a sandwich. New, longer television advertising spots will reflect the change in strategic positioning, that “Manwich is not only fun, but nutritious as well," a ConAgra executive said.
Aaron Baar, "ConAgra Ads Tout Manwich's Veggie-ness ", MediaPost News, October 23, 2009, © MediaPost Communications
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Fetuses, Newborns Found To Be At Much Greater Risk From Food-Borne Pathogen

October 23, 2009: 01:31 AM EST
Analyzing data from lab animal tests, scientists have found that listeriosis, a rare but often fatal bacterial infection among the elderly, fetuses or newborns, and individuals with compromised immune systems, may be occurring after exposure to much lower doses than once thought. Pregnant women who consume foods such as soft cheeses containing one million cells of Listeria monocytogenes – not 10 trillion cells, as thought previously – face a 50 percent chance that their fetus or infant will die. Scientists say the data do not suggest a new epidemic, but do confirm that Listeria is still a major public health problem.
Denita Williams, Jennifer Castleman, et al., "Risk of Fetal Mortality After Exposure to Listeria monocytogenes", Risk Analysis: An International Journal , October 23, 2009, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Snack Scientists Seek The Perfect – Healthy – Oil For Frying

October 23, 2009: 01:10 AM EST
With consumers demanding healthier fried foods, snack scientists and processors are taking a closer look at oils used in frying to find those that contain no saturated fats, but maintain stability and flavor during the cooking process. Palm oil is a possibility because it has no linolenic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, and only 10 percent polyunsaturated fats. Likewise, high-oleic canola oil is a bit more stable, and low-linolenic soybean oil is somewhat cheaper. On the technology horizon: a less-complicated method of oil extraction known as expeller-pressing that results in oils with natural antioxidants but without the trans fats.
R.J. Foster, "Checking the Oil for Snacks", Food Product Design, October 23, 2009, © Virgo Publishing, LLC.
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Omega-3 Supplement Did Not Ease Depression In Heart Patients Taking Sertraline

October 21, 2009: 05:48 AM EST
A placebo-controlled U.S. clinical trial found that enhancing sertraline antidepressant therapy with omega-3 fatty acid supplements did not improve depression in coronary heart disease patients after 10 weeks. The findings contradict earlier experimental results. In the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, 122 heart disease patients suffering from severe depression received 50 mg of sertraline a day. Randomly selected patients also received 2 grams of omega-3 fatty acids a day, while the rest received corn oil capsules. The researchers found that depression symptoms in the placebo and omega-3 groups improved over time at comparable rates.
Robert M. Carney, Ph.D.; Kenneth E. Freedland, Ph.D., et al., "Omega-3 Augmentation of Sertraline in Treatment of Depression in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease", Journal of the American Medical Association, October 21, 2009, © American Medical Association
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High Protein Diet Shrinks Brains Of Mice In Alzheimer’s Study

October 21, 2009: 01:58 AM EST
Mice fed a high protein diet were found to have smaller brains, according to an international study whose main purpose was to test the effects of a low-calorie, low-fat diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and fish on the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. The research team tested four different menus on a mouse model of Alzheimer’s. Unexpectedly, the brains of the mice fed a high protein/low carb diet were five percent lighter than the others. The researchers were not sure whether the loss of brain mass was associated with Alzheimer’s-type plaque in the brains.
Steve Pedrini , Carlos Thomas , Hannah Brautigam , James Schmeidler , Lap Ho , Paul Fraser , David Westaway , Peter St George Hyslop , Ralph N Martins , Joseph D Buxbaum , Giulio M Pasinetti , Dara L Dickstein , Patrick R Hof , Michelle E Ehrlich, et al., "Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology", Molecular Neurodegeneration 2009, October 21, 2009, © BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of Springer Science+Business Media.
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South African Government Says No To Genetically Modified Potatoes

October 20, 2009: 03:01 AM EST
An application by a South African group to supply genetically modified potatoes to farmers was rejected by the government. The Agricultural Research Council’s SpuntaG2 potato is engineered with a gene from a bacteria that kills a common crop-damaging pest known as the tuber moth. Restaurants and food retailers were opposed to the GM potatoes because they fear negative consumer reaction. Some opposed to the application said tuber moths were not as bad a problem for farmers as the lack of water and fertilizer, while others said it is still not known whether genetically modified foods are safe for human consumption.
Tamar Kahn, "Government rejects ‘super spuds’", Business Day, October 20, 2009, © BDFM Publishers (Pty) Ltd.
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Pilot Program That Taught Nutrition To Grade Schoolers Paid Off, Study Finds

October 19, 2009: 11:46 PM EST
A pilot study that sent registered dietitians into three public elementary schools to teach nutrition showed promising results, according to the American Dietetic Association. For example, thirty-one percent of students in the pilot schools reported eating a vegetable with school lunch, after they had reported not eating a vegetable with school lunch before the study. This compared with 17 percent of students from two control schools. The study was conducted in the Kansas City, Mo., area over a 14-week period among fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade students. Several nutrition education programs involving nutrition counseling and physical education games were tested.
"American Dietetic Association Foundation’s Healthy Schools Partnership Shows Positive Results in Influencing Healthful Diet Choices among Grade School Students", American Dietetic Association, October 19, 2009, © American Dietetic Association (ADA)
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If Mom Is Eating A Healthy Diet, The Kids Are, Too, Study Finds

October 19, 2009: 04:56 AM EST
When the diet of the adult female in a household with children follows U.S. government dietary guidance, most of the kids are eating just as well, according to a new NPD Group marketing study. But the study also found that moms’ attitudes toward nutrition often don’t fit with what they’re eating. In fact, 75 percent of new mothers and 65 percent of experienced moms said they shop for nutritious food, but don’t necessarily eat those foods. Another odd discrepancy: two-thirds of mothers felt they were very knowledgeable about nutrition and eating, but only half ranked their children very knowledgeable.
"NPD Finds Moms' Eating Habits and Nutritional Knowledge Influences What Their Kids Eat", The NPD Group, October 19, 2009, © The NPD Group
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Demand For Peanut Butter Buoys Peanut Sales Despite 2008 Salmonella Outbreak

October 19, 2009: 06:05 AM EST
The slump in sales of peanuts caused by last year’s national salmonella outbreak that killed nine people turned out to be short-lived, thanks apparently to America’s devotion to peanut butter as a food staple. Sales of peanuts for peanut butter bounced back in 2009 to their pre-outbreak strength, though sales for processed snacks remained down during the year ended July 31. The quantity of peanuts used to make peanut butter reached 1.1 million pounds, beating the previous record of one million pounds, according to the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. “Peanut butter manufacturers are running wide open," said one peanut farmer.
"Peanut Products Rebound after Health Scare", The Associated Press & CBS News, October 19, 2009, © The Associated Press
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Maintaining Flavor While Changing Food Formulas To Save Money Is Tricky, But Doable

October 19, 2009: 02:05 AM EST
Formulating existing or new food products to save money can be tricky, especially when trying to maintain flavor and functionality. This Food Product Design article explores a range of ideas for finding ingredient combinations and flavor substitutions that save money. For example, use a honey flavor rather than expensive honey; use dairy flavors to replace expensive ingredients like milk powder, buttermilk powder or sour-cream powder. Starches and gums add mouthfeel and texture when costly ingredients have been reduced. Other tips: consolidate ingredients and build volume with suppliers to boost savings, and use custom blends for production efficiency.
Cindy Hazen, "Ingredient Economics", Food Product Design, October 19, 2009, © Virgo Publishing, LLC.
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As Recession Grinds On, Food Marketers Should Emphasize Value, Innovation

October 19, 2009: 12:47 AM EST
The recession has spawned some interesting behavioral changes among U.S. food buyers, according to this Adweek overview of consumer research findings. Leading the list, of course, is the concern over the price of groceries: a Synovate survey found nearly two-thirds of respondents saying groceries were overpriced. Concerns about price pushed consumers toward private labels, cheaper frozen foods, and less healthy foods generally. Microwaving rather than cooking at home surged. Industry experts, seeing products like “better for you” foods rebounding after the recession, nevertheless urge marketers to forge an emotional bond with consumers, stress value and innovation.
Mark Dolliver , "A New World for Grocery Shoppers", Adweek, October 19, 2009, © Nielsen Business Media
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Labeling Of Food’s Health Benefits Found Important To Europeans

October 19, 2009: 02:23 AM EST
Health and wellness continue to be important to European consumers, according to research from Tate & Lyle, which also found that consumers are willing to spend more on foods whose health benefits are clearly described on product labels. A poll of 1,565 consumers in five countries found that 53 percent often check product nutritional information, while 57 percent look at the ingredient list on the package to determine whether a product is healthy. Reduced fat and sugar content were important to half of those polled, while 80 percent would pay more for products promising improved cardiovascular health or help controlling cholesterol.
"Tate & Lyle unveils latest European consumer research findings", Tate & Lyle, October 19, 2009, © Tate & Lyle
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Cutting 100 Calories A Day Has Many Benefits, ConAgra “Awareness” Campaign Pledges

October 18, 2009: 02:56 AM EST
ConAgra has launched an “awareness” campaign with the pledge that eating 100 fewer calories a day as part of a healthy lifestyle can improve health, improve productivity, and cut healthcare costs. Research sponsored by the company (published in the American Journal of Health Promotion) showed that a small reduction in calorie intake could reduce the number of cases of diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other diseases associated with obesity. The company suggested substituting one of its Healthy Choice meals for a take-out lunch, Egg Beaters for eggs, and SmartPop popcorn as a whole grain, calorie-controlled, sodium-controlled snack.
"Conagra Foods Introduces 100 Calories Less Pledge", ConAgra Foods, October 18, 2009, © ConAgra Foods, Inc.
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Low-Fat Yogurt Fortified With Protein And Fiber Reduces Appetite

October 17, 2009: 06:53 AM EST
A low-fat dairy product enriched with protein and fiber can significantly reduce short-term appetite, new French and British research has found. In controlled laboratory studies, healthy women were fed a mid-morning snack of either the control (regular yogurt) or a low-fat yogurt enriched with eight grams of protein and 2.9 grams of fiber. The scientists recorded subjective factors like hunger, fullness, desire to eat and prospective consumption throughout the morning. Two hours later, the researchers measured food intake at lunch. “The test product reduced subjective appetite compared to the control,” the scientists concluded. And the women ate less.
Anne Lluch, et al, "Short-term appetite-reducing effects of a low-fat dairy product enriched with protein and fibre", Food Quality and Preference, October 17, 2009, via Food Quality and Preference, © Elsevier B.V.
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ConAgra Says Cutting Salt Content Of Its Foods Is A “Serious” Goal

October 15, 2009: 11:03 PM EST
Responding to consumer demands for healthier foods, ConAgra Foods said it plans to eliminate eight million pounds of salt from its foods, which include the Healthy Choice frozen dinners, by 2015 – a total of 20 percent of the salt content. It has already cut salt by two million pounds since 2006, including 27 percent of the salt content of Kid Cuisine frozen meals. A 2008 market research survey found that 41 percent of shoppers said they are using low sodium products once a week or more. “We’re taking this very seriously and we’re acting upon it,” a ConAgra exec said.
Duane D. Stanford, "ConAgra Sets ‘Lead Dog’ Goal to Cut Food Salt by 20%", Bloomberg, October 15, 2009, © Bloomberg L.P.
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Connecticut Launches Probe Into The Selection Criteria Of Dubious “Smart Choice” Label

October 15, 2009: 11:34 AM EST
Connecticut’s attorney general has begun an investigation into the underlying standards of the “Smart Choice” nutritional food label, as well as the role of the food industry in developing the label. Richard Blumenthal asked how it was possible that sugary cereals like Froot Loops and Frosted Flakes are a smart choice food, while other nutritionally stronger breakfast cereals are not. Likewise, Lipton beverages are labeled a “smart choice” while other beverages are not. Concerned about “potentially misleading and deceptive labeling of nutritional value,” Blumenthal has asked for selection criteria information from the Smart Choices Program and from food manufacturers.
"Attorney General Investigates "Smart Choices" Food Labels That Endorse Mayonnaise and Sugary Cereals", Connecticut Attorney General's Office, October 15, 2009, © State of Connecticut
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Will Kraft Sell Maxwell House Line To Raise Cash For Cadbury Deal?

October 16, 2009: 02:12 AM EST
Kraft, faced with a November 9 deadline to either make a formal bid for Cadbury or abandon the $9 billion deal for six months, is considering selling its Maxwell House coffee line to Sara Lee to raise cash to enhance the offer, sources told the New York Post. Kraft spokesmen would not comment on speculation regarding a Maxwell House divestiture, except to say that the company doesn’t need a divestiture to fund a Cadbury deal. A Sara Lee investor, meanwhile, told the Post a Maxwell House acquisition would fit nicely into the company’s strategic plan.
Josh Kosman, "Kraft may 'drop' Maxwell House", New York Post, October 16, 2009, © NYP Holdings, Inc.
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Burcon Awarded U.S. Patent Allowances For Canola-Based Food Processing Ingredients

October 15, 2009: 09:27 AM EST
The U.S. Patent Office has awarded patent allowances for technologies related to the production of canola protein-based food ingredients from Canada’s Burcon NutraScience Corporation. Burcon’s Puratein is described as a cruciferin-rich canola protein isolate with emulsification and thickening properties useful in making dressings, sauces, meat substitutes, baked goods, and protein bars. Supertein is a napin-rich canola protein isolate made of albumin proteins whose solubility and foaming properties make it useful for beverages, candies, desserts, and protein bars. The company, which also makes a soy protein isolate, says securing the patent allowances is critical to its commercialization strategy.
"Burcon Receives three Notices of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office", Newswire, October 15, 2009, © CNW Group
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Compound Produced In Red Grape Skins May Have Positive Impact On Diabetes

October 15, 2009: 06:26 AM EST
When acting directly by injection on certain brain proteins called sirtuins, a polyphenol compound known as resveratrol may offer some protection against diabetes, new U.S. research in obese and diabetic mice has found. Insulin levels in placebo mice rose, while levels in mice given resveratrol, which is produced in red grape skins, dropped and were halfway to normal after the study period. All tested animals ate a high-fat diet. Researchers said findings support their theory that the brain plays a vital role in mediating the beneficial effects of resveratrol. In addition, sirtuins may have other beneficial outcomes.
Giorgio Ramadori, Laurent Gautron, et al., "Central Administration of Resveratrol Improves Diet-Induced Diabetes", Endocrinology, October 15, 2009, © The Endocrine Society
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Cognis CLA Product Wins Approval For Use In Chinese Market

October 14, 2009: 11:20 AM EST
German nutritional ingredients supplier Cognis said that China has okayed its safflower-derived conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) product Tonalin as a “novel food” for use in functional foods and beverages. Tonalin, also used in dietary supplements, has potential applications in milk and yogurt products, fruit juices, soy milk, and meal replacement beverages and bars, according to the company. Tonalin was tested in a skimmed milk product in a placebo-controlled trial in which “a significant reduction of body fat mass in overweight subjects” was found. The company said the results showed CLA has promise as a beneficial food supplement.
"Cognis first company to achieve Novel Food approval for CLA in China ", Cognis, October 14, 2009, © Cognis
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Australia Requires Iodine Fortification In Bread

October 9, 2009: 12:44 AM EST
With iodine intake found to be inadequate among 43 percent of Australians and New Zealanders, the Australian government has mandated iodine fortification in bread to ensure that the population is getting enough of the essential nutrient. Pregnant women who do not get enough dietary iodine risk reduced mental performance in their children. The government says the new requirement will reduce inadequate iodine consumption to less than 5 percent. The required increase is safe, and approximates the iodine level found in a large glass of milk. Australia also recently mandated fortification of bread with folic acid to prevent spina bifida.
"Essential nutrient iodine to be added to bread in Australia", FSANZ, October 09, 2009, © Food Standards Australia New Zealand
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Your Dad’s Meat-And-Potatoes Meal Has A Whole New Look These Days

October 9, 2009: 01:47 AM EST
Restaurant chefs have long known that coupling a great protein entrée with the right starchy side dish – rice, potatoes, or pasta – often boosts sales of the entrée. Consumers have caught onto the role of starchy side dishes as well, buying lots of long-storing frozen and quick-prep retail sides where excellent flavor is critically important. Starchy sides offer a perfectly satisfying balance of plate presentation, flavor delivery and mouth feel both in restaurant dishes and speed-scratch home foods. This Food Product Design article takes a close look at today’s innovative approaches to finding and preparing potatoes, grains, and pastas.
Keith Darling, "Starch on the Side", Food Product Design, October 09, 2009, © Virgo Publishing, LLC.
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As Vegan Recipes Get Tastier, The Vegan Diet Gains Devotees

October 8, 2009: 03:24 AM EST
Although the vegan diet – no animal products, including dairy and eggs – will probably always be a niche lifestyle, it is steadily gaining adherents, according to this Hartford Courant article. Thanks to the availability of good ingredients and meat substitutes, as well as an increasing number of vegetable-oriented cookbooks and recipes, the diet can be flavorful and nutritious, containing lots of protein, calcium and iron. Says one cookbook editor of the mushrooming veganism trend: “Consumers are interested in eating locally, eating seasonally and eating a diet that's good for them and good for their family, so they're open to new ideas."
Korky Vann, "Turn Over A New Leaf: Vegan Diets Are Moving More Solidly Into Mainstream ", The Hartford Courant, October 08, 2009, © The Hartford Courant
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Food Companies Explore Nanotechnologies For Advanced Nutrient Delivery, Bioavailability

October 8, 2009: 03:05 AM EST
The application of advanced nanotechnologies in the food processing industry is beginning to have an impact on raw material sourcing that could lead to major changes in how food products affect human physiology. Although nanotechnology is in its infancy, as this article points out, food companies are exploring its potential as a nutrient delivery option (nanoencapsulation) and for enhanced nutrient availability in the intestinal tract. For example, German chemical manufacturer BASF is making nano-scale synthetic lycopene as a food additive that is more easily absorbed by the body and has a longer shelf life.
"Tiny, invisible ingredients", Kantha Shelke, October 08, 2009, © Food Processing
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Candy Company Goes National With Naturally Sweetened Candies

October 8, 2009: 12:25 AM EST
Surf Sweets candies – sweetened without corn syrup – are now available in stores all over the U.S., the company announced recently. The candies, which include four vegan and five vegetarian options, are made with organic fruit juice and sweeteners. Each Surf Sweets 2.75-oz. bag of candies, which feature varieties like Fruity Bears, Gummy Swirls, Sour Berry Bears, etc., contains 120-140 calories per serving depending on the variety. Manufactured in the U.S., the candies are available online, and in grocery and natural foods stores and specialty retailers in the U.S. and Canada.
"Naturally Sweetened, Totally Delicious Surf Sweets Candy Now Available Nationally, and It's Corn Syrup-Free", PR Web, October 08, 2009, © TruSweets, LLC
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Yogurt Makers Group Sees Probiotics Rejections As Part Of A Learning Phase

October 7, 2009: 12:51 PM EST
A group representing the world’s biggest yogurt makers said the European Food Safety Authority’s recent rejection of health claims for probiotic ingredients represents only “technical obstacles” that can be overcome. The Authority completely rejected ten claims while ruling that another 170 simply could not be evaluated because of a lack of evidence. Noting that the rejections were part of a learning phase of a new evaluation system, the Yogurt and Live Fermented Milks Association said its members were working closely with the EFSA so that researchers could continue to assess the health benefits of probiotics yogurt.
Shane Starling, "Yoghurt group unfazed by mass probiotics rejection", Nutra ingrdients.com, October 07, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Flavonoid Quercetin Fails To Convince Scientists Of Its Performance Enhancement Abilities

October 7, 2009: 05:47 AM EST
Once heralded as a potential miraculous – and legal – performance enhancer among athletes, thanks to early studies in mice, quercetin has proven to be a dud. Follow-on U.S. studies in humans found that the flavonoid, an antioxidant found in apple skins, berries, and red wine, does not enhance athletic performance any better than a placebo. The human studies failed to replicate animal study results where quercetin mice ran 37 percent longer than before and developed new energy-producing mitochondria in cells. “My conclusion is that [quercetin] just is not ergogenic in humans,” said one U.S. researcher. “It doesn’t improve performance.”
GRETCHEN REYNOLDS, "Phys Ed: Is Quercetin Really a Wonder Sports Supplement?", The New York Times, October 07, 2009, © The New York Times Company
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Health-Conscious Consumers Catching On To Euphemism For Margarine, Manufacturers Say

October 7, 2009: 10:02 AM EST
The word margarine has gone the way of words like prune, stewardess, and skim milk, according to a U.S. group representing margarine makers. In its place is the term “buttery spread,” which better represents lower-fat spreads made with plant oils. A national survey recently found 45 percent of consumers saying the spread they used most often at meals is a buttery or soft margarine spread. Only 24 percent preferred stick butter. Fifty-four percent believe buttery spreads and soft margarine spreads are heart-healthier than butter, which can have 7 grams of trans fat per serving. Buttery spreads have no trans fat.
"Buttery Spreads Become the Toast of the Town", Buttery Spreads.org, October 07, 2009, © National Association of Margarine Manufacturers
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U.K. Agency Bans “Misleading” Ads For Coca-Cola Vitaminwater

October 7, 2009: 02:41 AM EST
Claims made in ads for Coca-Cola’s Vitaminwater - that the product lifted energy levels, helped resist illness, and offered the same health benefits as vegetables - were "misleading," the U.K.’s Advertising Standards Authority ruled recently. Responding to complaints from consumers, the ASA banned the ads, despite Coca-Cola’s explanation that references to "brussels" in the ads alluded to actor Jean-Claude Van Damme, the "Muscles from Brussels." Said the ASA: "It was not clear...that the claim intended to refer to a well-known actor." The agency also said ads suggesting the drink boosted immunity, increased strength or enhanced mood were equally untrue.
Margaret Davis, "Coca-Cola's vitamin drink ad 'misleading'", The Independent, October 07, 2009, © independent.co.uk
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Chemistry Group Highlights “Flaws” In Study Of BPA Impact On Unborn Children

October 7, 2009: 02:33 AM EST
The latest study to suggest significant health risks associated with exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used to manufacture plastics, is flawed, according to the American Chemistry Council. The small-scale study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found a link between exposure to BPA by pregnant women and aggressive behavior in two-year-old girls. The ACA said the authors of the study acknowledged design flaws and noted that the flaws can only be rectified in a larger, “more robust study.” “Inherent in the design,” ACA said, “is the inability to establish cause-effect relationships.”
Mike Stones, "Latest BPA study “flawed” says American Chemistry Council", Food Production Daily.com, October 07, 2009, © American Chemistry Council, Inc.
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Bacteria Contamination Found In Nearly All Sectors Of The Food Supply

October 6, 2009: 05:42 AM EST
Thanks to recent news coverage, most people in the U.S. are aware of the dangers of eating bacteria-contaminated meat products such as beef and poultry. But fewer consumers are likely to know that other food products contaminated during the preparation process, including ice cream and berries, have made people sick. According to a Center for Science in the Public Interest report, leafy greens, eggs, and tuna are the riskiest foods after beef and poultry. Oysters, potatoes, and cheese are also on the list. “Unfortunately, the hazards now come from all areas of the food supply,” the CSPI says.
TARA PARKER-POPE, "Ten Common Food Poisoning Risks", The New York Times, October 06, 2009, © The New York Times Company
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Inulin Fiber Offers Healthy, Savory Substitute For Fat In Snack Bars - Study

October 6, 2009: 03:54 AM EST
Researchers in Brazil have found that a flavoring mixture made with the prebiotic fiber inulin and oligofructose can satisfactorily replace fatty flavorings in snack bars. Scientists reporting in the International Journal of Food Science & Technology found that the replacement ingredients reduced the glycemic index of the snack bars by 25 percent and increased fiber content sevenfold, while eliminating trans fat from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. An added benefit: consumers liked the taste. In fact, 42 people gave the inulin-oligofructose bar an acceptability score of 6.6, compared to 7.4 for the fat flavored bar.
Stephen Daniells , "Fibre may replace trans-fats for snack formulations", Food Navigator.com, October 06, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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USDA’s Latest Nutrient Database Profiles 7,500 Foods

October 7, 2009: 02:42 AM EST
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has added 200 entries to the newest version of its big nutrient database, the Standard Reference, Release 22, with information on more than 7,500 food items. Food profiles list as many as 140 components, including vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids. For the first time, the database includes 3,000 values for vitamin D content of foods, including 20 species of fish and fortified foods such as milk, orange juice, etc. Restaurant foods were added to the new version, with information on items at family-style restaurants, Latino restaurants and Chinese restaurants.
Rosalie Marion Bliss, "Latest Version of USDA's Premier Nutrient Database Released", Agricultural Research Service, USDA, October 07, 2009, © Agricultural Research Service
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Turmeric Extract Destroys Esophageal Cancer Cells In Lab Experiment

October 6, 2009: 01:44 AM EST
An extract of the yellow curry spice turmeric destroyed esophagus cancer cells in a laboratory, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Cancer. Researchers examining curcumin’s effect on various types of cancer cells from the esophagus – which are often resistant to chemotherapy – induced a type of cell death called mitotic catastrophe. According to the study, cancer cells lost their viability 24 hours of incubation with curcumin. Higher doses of curcumin had a more powerful effect. The scientists said it’s still far too early to tell whether curcumin can be used as a cancer treatment.
G O'Sullivan-Coyne, G C O'Sullivan, et al., "Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells", British Journal of Cancer, October 06, 2009, © Cancer Research UK
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General Mills Helps Launch Healthy Weight Coalition To Focus On Reducing Obesity

October 6, 2009: 07:33 AM EST
General Mills recently joined retailers, non-government organizations and other food and beverage makers to launch the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation (HWCF), a multi-year U.S. effort to try to help reduce obesity – especially childhood obesity – by 2015. According to the company, the HWCF will promote ways to help people achieve a healthy weight by balancing calories consumed with calories expended through physical activity. Efforts will focus on three areas where people spend time: the marketplace, the workplace and schools. The company says its own health and wellness strategy targets weight management, heart health, and a healthy, active lifestyle.
"General Mills Joins Unprecedented Coalition to Help Reduce Obesity", WEBWIRE , October 06, 2009, © WebWire
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New York City’s Fast-Food Calorie Labeling Rule Has Little Impact On Low-Income Diners

October 6, 2009: 10:38 AM EST
New York City’s new anti-obesity rule requiring fast food restaurants to display calorie information about the meals they serve apparently had little impact on junk food consumption, especially among low income customers, according to research published in Health Affairs. The study conducted among 1,156 adults in low-income neighborhoods shortly after the rule went into effect in July 2008 found that about half were aware of the calorie labels, but only a quarter of those had changed their purchase patterns. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the study was conducted too soon after the rule was implemented.
"Calorie labeling doesn't curb NYC fast food habits", Reuters, October 06, 2009, © Project HOPE–The People-to-People Organization
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Federal Government Reaches Out To Produce Industry To Promote Food Safety

October 6, 2009: 06:55 AM EST
The Obama administration’s food processing watchdogs – the Food & Drug Administration and the Dept. of Agriculture – are not only working more closely together to ensure food safety, they are stepping up efforts to involve the produce industry itself, including small and organic farmers, and state and local food safety officials. To signal the importance of the issue as a national priority, the USDA recently sent a top produce marketing expert to the FDA for a six-month stint focusing on food safety. “We are pulling together all our best resources," said chief U.S. health official Kathleen Sebelius.
DAN FLYNN , "USDA Sends Produce Expert to FDA", Food Safety News, October 06, 2009, © Marler Clark
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Fiery Capsaicin Shows Beneficial Effect On Diabetes-Related Factors

October 5, 2009: 10:48 AM EST
A new study in mice has found that consumption of capsaicin, the ingredient that gives chili peppers their fiery personality, can reduce obesity factors associated with diabetes. The South Korean study found that capsaicin cut glucose, insulin, and leptin levels, “and markedly reduced the impairment of glucose tolerance.” The findings signal a potentially increased role for capsaicin in the $4 billion U.S. weight management market, though additional human studies will be necessary. Long used in folk medicine to treat rheumatism, capsaicin has recently been studied for its impact on pancreatic cancer cell growth and consumption of fat.
Stephen Daniells, "Chilli extract may prevent obesity complications: Study", Nutra Ingredients-USA, October 05, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Survey Finds Britons Unaware Of Certain Foods Contributing Most Salt To Diet

October 5, 2009: 04:59 AM EST
People in the U.K. are increasingly aware of the connection between high levels of salt ingested and an increased risk of health problems, including high blood pressure, stroke and cardiovascular disease. But in a recent survey by the Food Standards Agency, 77 percent of respondents did not know that certain foods eaten every day, including bread and breakfast cereals, have very high salt content. Of more than 2,000 people asked their opinions and feelings about salt, only 13 percent picked bread as one of the top three of the 10 saltiest foods, while only 12 percent selected breakfast cereals.
"Survey reveals lack of salt source knowledge", Food Standards Agency, October 05, 2009, © Crown copyright
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U.S. Public Schools Gradually Clamping Down On Vending Machine Junk Food Access

October 5, 2009: 07:03 AM EST
Sixteen percent of children and teens are obese, thanks to junk food, and are at risk for many health problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. America’s middle and high schools are doing a better job of restricting student access to vending machine junk food: a CDC survey of principals in 40 states found that the median number of schools limiting soft drinks was 63 percent, up from 38 percent in 2006. The CDC survey also found that some states are doing much better than others in controlling school junk food access.
Maggie Fox, "U.S. schools do a little better trimming junk food", Reuters, October 05, 2009, © Thomson Reuters
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Efforts Underway To Develop Novel Sources Of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

October 3, 2009: 04:50 AM EST
Marine algal oils and fish oils are the main sources of long-chain omega-3s, which have been proven beneficial to heart and cardiovascular health. Now, applying genetic manipulation techniques, Australian researchers are using marine algae to develop land-based oilseed crop plants that synthesize omega-3 oils. The researchers expect to release the plants commercially within five or six years. In related research an Australian scientist is working on ways to boost the omega-3 oil content of lamb. "Lamb already contains varied levels of long-chain omega-3 which can be boosted using marine algae and fish oils in feeds," he says.
"New Sources Of Omega-3 From Grains And Lamb", CSIRO Australia, October 03, 2009, © MediLexicon International Ltd.
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New Lifestyle Program Advocates Balancing Omega 6 And Omega 3 Levels

October 2, 2009: 06:22 AM EST
The new Gene Smart diet and lifestyle program from a North Carolina company is based on the idea that increasing polyphenol antioxidants, fiber, and omega fats, reducing calories and exercising more will send healthy messages to our genes. These in turn will trigger weight loss, boosted energy, and reduced inflammation. The biggest key to success with the program, according to this Nutraceuticals World article, is getting just the right balance of omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids. For $149.95 you can buy a home blood test from Gene Smart Wellness that will measure your omega 3 levels.
Joanna Cosgrove, "The Gene Smart Program ", Nutraceuticals World, October 02, 2009, © Rodman Publishing
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U.K. Scientists Find Correlation Between Daily Childhood Candy Eating And Violent Adult Behavior

October 2, 2009: 02:47 AM EST
Is there a connection between daily consumption of candy in childhood and violent behavior later in life? Scientists in the U.K. think it’s possible. In a four-decade study, researchers followed 17,000 children born in 1970, finding that 69 percent of adults who said they had acted violently also said they had eaten candy daily at age 10. Only 42 percent who did not commit violent acts said they had eaten candy daily. But some scientists were skeptical, saying the study did not control for other causative factors, such as a violent childhood home life or poor nutrition in general.
Jennifer Thomas, "Daily Candy in Childhood Linked to Violence in Adulthood", Health Day, October 02, 2009, © The Royal College of Psychiatrists
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Food Processors’ Big Challenge: Feeding America’s Sweet Tooth With Healthier Options

October 2, 2009: 09:34 AM EST
Makers of candies, cakes, ice creams, and other sweet treats are tackling a formidable challenge: finding healthier replacement ingredients for sugar and fat without sacrificing taste, texture, or consumer satisfaction. FoodProcessing.com interviewed food processors and ingredients suppliers to find out how they are handling the problem. Some ingredient solutions so far: probiotics in ice creams, whole grain cookie formulas, gum-based and other fat replacements, alternative sweeteners, and antioxidant fruits. Tricky problems linger, like “mouthfeel” and shelf life, when sugar and fat are reduced. “It remains very challenging to swap key ingredients for others with healthier benefits,” says one exec.
David Feder, "How to Build a Healthier Dessert", Food Processing.com, October 02, 2009, © Food Processing
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Study Finds That Gingko Biloba Extract Protects Cells From Radiation Damage

October 1, 2009: 08:14 PM EST
Extracts of the leaves of the Gingko biloba tree contain antioxidant compounds that are thought to protect the body’s cells from oxidation damage by free radicals. But now scientists in Korea have found that the extracts may also protect cells from radiation damage. White blood cells were treated either with Gingko biloba extract or with a saline solution, then exposed to radiation. Almost a third of the untreated cells died compared with only one in twenty of the treated cells. The findings suggest that the extracts may some day be used to reduce side effects in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.
Jeong-hoon Shin, Young-jin Go, et al., "Protective effect of Gingko biloba against radiation-induced cellular damage in human peripheral lymphocytes and murine spleen cells", International Journal of Low Radiation, October 01, 2009, © Inderscience Enterprises Limited
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Trimming U.S. Healthcare Spending: Start By Tackling The Obesity Problem

October 2, 2009: 06:30 AM EST
America is spending $147 billion a year dealing with the medical impact of obesity, which is often the underlying cause of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and other health problems. A recent report found that more than 25 percent of adults in 31 states are obese. In fact, two-thirds of all adult Americans are obese or overweight, and that should be the starting point for healthcare cost cutting. How to tackle the problem? Experts in this article suggest increasing daily physical activity (not just purposeful exercise), designing communities to promote healthier lifestyles, and implementing policy initiatives like taxes on sugary beverages.
Joanna Cosgrove, "The Widening of America ", Nutraceuticals World, October 02, 2009, © Rodman Publishing
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Joint Venture Firm Building Cereal Innovation Center In Switzerland

October 2, 2009: 03:52 AM EST
A joint venture between Swiss food maker Nestlé S.A. and General Mills Inc., has begun construction of an innovation center in Orbe, Switzerland, to develop breakfast cereals that feature better nutrition along with freshness, taste and texture. The joint venture, known as Cereal Partners Worldwide S.A., is the second largest cereal manufacturer in the world, with US$2.8 billion in 2008 sales and is strategically focused on nutrition, health, and wellness. The new center, slated to be completed in mid-2010, is being built with sustainability and low environmental impact in mind.
"New Innovation Centre to accelerate research on breakfast cereal solutions ", Nestle, October 02, 2009, © Nestle
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Isoflavone-Based Menopause Treatments Found Safe

October 2, 2009: 10:11 AM EST
An Austrian meta-analysis of 92 clinical trials involving nearly 10,000 menopausal women found no serious side effects from treatments using phytoestrogens such as soy and red clover isoflavones. Researchers stressed that the findings, published in the American Journal of medicine, did not address the issue of therapy effectiveness, only safety. Isoflavone supplements have been shown to provide symptom relief when taken instead of hormone replacement drugs. Concern was raised when mouse studies suggested that isoflavones stimulated breast cancer cells. But human population studies have found lower breast cancer rates in women who consumed large amounts of soy isoflavones.
Stephen Daniells , "Meta-analysis supports safety of soy, red clover", Food Navigator.com, October 02, 2009, © Decision News Media SAS
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Rosy Future Projected For Foods Enhanced With Prebiotics/Probiotics

October 2, 2009: 05:55 AM EST
New U.S. market research forecasts double-digit growth in the pre- and probiotic markets, thanks to improvements in formulation technology and more knowledgeable consumers. According to Packaged Facts, the pre- and probiotics market will grow by a compound annual rate of 12 percent to $22 billion by 2013. Two key factors fueling the growth: novel formulations increase the array of improvable foods; and consumers are more aware of the link between digestive health and wellness overall. The worldwide retail market for foods and beverages enhanced with pre- and probiotic ingredients was $15 billion in 2008, up 13 percent from 2007.
"Pre/Probiotic Market to Expand as Consumers Better Understand Link Between Digestive Health & Immunity", Nutraceuticals World, October 02, 2009, © Rodman Publishing
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