Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<12345678910>> Total results:8042 References Per Page:

“Third Culture” Bakers Bring Mochi Muffins To S.F. Bay Area

March 17, 2019: 12:00 AM EST


The mochi muffin has been slowly working its way into San Francisco Bay Area cafe culture since 2017, thanks to Indonesian immigrant and “third culture” baker Sam Butarbutar – he spent many of his younger years both in Indonesia and the U.S. The mochi muffin marries the flavor of a Southeast Asian steamed layered cake made with mochiko flour milled from sticky rice, coconut milk and pandan. The mochi muffin is caramelized on the outside with dense innards, all sprinkled with black and white sesame seeds.  According to food writer Leena Trivedi-Grenier, the muffin is “a beautiful medley of textures combining chewy Hawaiian butter mochi and the brittle edges of an American brownie.”[Image Credit: © Third Culture Bakery from Instagram]
Leena Trivedi-Grenier, "Third Culture’s mochi muffins have swept the Bay Area. Mochi doughnuts are next", The San Francisco Chronicle, March 17, 2019, © Hearst
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vegan Bakeries Sprout Across The State Of Maine

March 17, 2019: 12:00 AM EST

Vegan bakers in Maine, committed to providing vegan baked goods for all purposes and occasion, have begun making vegan cakes. Mandaylynn Fleshman of Scattoloni Bakery in Portland makes vegan cakes for birthdays, anniversaries and other special occasions, and makes sure the display case is stocked with at least two types of vegan cupcakes, chocolate mousse cups (made with aquafaba), chocolate-cherry cake bomb truffles, chia-spiced shortbread, and coconut-orange date balls. But vegan cakes aren't just a Portland thing: they are appearing at bakeries across the state, a trend fueled by the fact that more people are eating vegan, and more people are avoiding dairy products and eggs due to allergies and intolerances. The availability of vegan cakes is a marked change from even a few years ago.[Image Credit: © Raegamuffin's Gluten Free Bakery]
Avery Yale Kamila, "Good and plenty: Vegan cakes come into their own", Portland Press Herald, March 17, 2019, © Press Herald
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Premium Gin In U.K. Is Made From Upcycled Surplus Table Grapes

March 14, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
HYKE premium gin, made from unsold table grapes, is now available at 300 Tesco stores in the U.K. as part of the grocery chain’s commitment to reducing food waste. The grape-based gin was developed through a partnership involving major British fruit supplier Richard Hochfeld Ltd and craft spirits distiller Foxhole Spirits. They are upcycling an estimated 166 million surplus table grapes to make the beverage, which debuts at a time of burgeoning gin popularity in the U.K.: gin sales are at a 50-year high and demand for premium gin at Tesco was up by nearly 90 percent in 2018. Hochfeld says it loses the equivalent of 1.4 million baskets of table grapes in the packing process. HYKE is made with those surplus grapes blended with botanicals from Africa and South America.[Image Credit: © Tescoplc.com]
"First ever gin made from surplus table grapes to launch across U.K.", Tesco PLC, March 14, 2019, © Tescoplc.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Ingredients
Innovation
Market News
New Products
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Genetically Engineered Salmon: Appearing Soon At Your Local Grocery Store

March 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The FDA has lifted a ban on genetically engineered salmon, clearing the way for its appearance in grocery stores. The company AquaBounty may now import its AquaAdvantage Salmon eggs to a land-based facility in Indiana, where the salmon can be grown for food. The fish have been genetically engineered to grow faster than farm-raised Atlantic salmon. But Native American tribes, food groups, and environmentalists are concerned that there is no requirement that the gene-manipulated fish be labeled as “genetically engineered.” Instead, they can be labeled “bioengineered,” a less-loaded term that can appear on packages as a symbol that says “BE” or a QR code that can be scanned with a smartphone to find out if it's genetically engineered. "So it's quite a bit more burdensome,” according to a Center for Food Safety attorney. The FDA first approved genetically engineered salmon as safe to eat in 2015.[Image Credit: © AquaBounty Technologies, Inc]
Courtney Flatt, "Concerns raised over genetically engineered salmon", The Daily Astorian, (Oregon), March 13, 2019, © The Daily Astorian
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Innovation
Production
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Big Upper Midwest Food Distributor SpartanNash “Cleans Up” Its House Brands

March 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Fortune 400 food distributor SpartanNash, which operates a chain of retail grocery stores in the upper Midwest and serves U.S military commissaries, is responding to customer preferences by accelerating a program to simplify private brand product ingredients and provide more transparency. “Our store guests are looking for healthier food options, clean labels and ‘free from’ formats when shopping at their local grocery store or putting food on the table," a spokesman said. In response, SpartanNash has reformulated or redesigned packaging for more than 425 products in its Our Family and Open Acres private labels since last year, removing synthetic colors, MSG, and other ingredients. Another 175 products will be added to the initiative during 2019. According to the company, the program focuses on providing customers with simpler products, shorter ingredient lists, and clean, easy-to-read labels. [Image Credit: © SpartanNash Company]
Russell Redman , "SpartanNash comes ‘clean’ with private brands", Supermarket News, March 13, 2019, © Informa USA, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Retail
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Private Label
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

North Carolina Baker Seeks To Revive The Community Bakery Tradition

March 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A North Carolina baker has launched a Community Supported Bakery (CSB) at a location in a small town that has housed several start-up bakeries over the years. The idea is based on a European tradition that arose at a time when many individual homes lacked ovens; outdoor ovens became community gathering places. The space in Marshall does not have a retail facility, but has been used for baking workshops, a tradition Brennan Johnson and his Walnut Schoolhouse bakery plans to continue and grow. Johnson says he will sell sourdough breads at local farmers markets, and his workshops will focus on Scandinavian baking. Other bakers will teach cakes, croissants, bagels and other subjects. Johnson has been baking since high school. He travelled to Europe with his parents in ninth grade to research old community ovens to learn how they became community-gathering places.[Image Credit: © jacqueline macou from Pixabay]
Angela Nicholas , "Young baker brings fresh baked breads to community", The Asheville Citizen-Times (North Carolina), March 13, 2019, © www.citizen-times.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
New Products
Production
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

“Natural” Claim Continues To Lure Shoppers, Despite Lack Of Definition

March 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A Label Insight-sponsored survey of 1,000 adult consumers finds that using the word “natural” on food packaging will motivate as many as 53 percent of Americans to make a purchase. Natural is generally accepted to mean the absence of artificial flavors, sweeteners, preservatives, and color additives in products that are minimally processed. Fifty-one percent of shoppers were swayed by "no preservatives," particularly older generations. Sixty-three percent of Baby Boomers say a product with that claim would motivate them to buy compared to 46 percent of Generation X and 41 percent of Millennials. Other ingredients Americans are concerned about include: high fructose corn syrup (57 percent of older adults) and sugar (all ages). And shoppers increasingly want to know the conditions under which the fish, poultry and livestock they're eating were raised: "antibiotic free" (34 percent); "free range" (26 percent); "grass fed" (25 percent); and "pasture-raised" (17 percent) are the key terms. Oddly, free range and pasture-raised are synonymous.[Image Credit: © Label Insight, Inc.]
"New Survey from Label Insight Reveals Which Loosely-Regulated Marketing Claims Motivate Shoppers to Buy", PR Newswire, March 13, 2019, © PR Newswire Association LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Clean Food
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Singapore Airline Caterer Invests In Technology That Reduces Flight Food Waste

March 12, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Hoping to cut the number of extra meals that end up in the trash after every flight, Singapore-based airline caterer Sats has invested in new pasteurization technology that extends the shelf life of cooked food for as much as 24 months. Fresh meals chilled immediately can now be stored for up to 90 days without added preservatives instead of the typical 48 hours. Thanks to pasteurization and sterilization, ready-to-eat meals – e.g., braised chicken rice, chicken briyani, beef stroganoff, pasta alfredo, and black pepper chicken udon – can be stored without refrigeration for six to 24 months. There is no adverse impact on food safety, nutrition or taste. Sats recently opened an extended kitchen facility at a Singapore airport that can now produce up to 60,000 meals a day, compared to 45,000 before.[Image Credit: © SATS Ltd]
"Sats unveils S$25m investment in new technology to boost output, cut waste", The Business Times Singapore, March 12, 2019, © SINGAPORE PRESS HOLDINGS LTD.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Innovation
Production
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Singapore

Americans Are Turning From Candy Bars To Shots Of Healthful Drinks For A Quick Energy Boost

March 12, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
American consumers increasingly view bottled potable soups, bone broths, plant-based lattes, and cold-pressed juices as healthful between-meal snacks. The beverages are taking the place of crackers and candy bars at snack time because they can be rich in protein, carbs, and fat that provide a mid-morning energy boost. Examples of the trend include: Fairlife Smart Snack nutrition shakes (Coca-Cola distributor) featuring ultra-filtered milk blended with honey and oats; and Well Yes! Sipping Soups (Campbell) available in harvest carrot and ginger, tomato and sweet basil, and butternut squash and sweet potato. One industry observer says the difference between a beverage snack and a meal replacement drink “comes down to portion size.” In other words, a shot of healthful juice or soup versus a 20-oz shake. 
Monica Watrous, "Is it a beverage? Or is it a snack? The answer is yes", Food Business News, March 12, 2019, © SOSLAND PUBLISHING COMPANY
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Developers Of New Food Spoilage Sensor Technology Seek Development Funding

March 8, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A new technology that will “smell' when fruit or vegetables are deteriorating is in the works in the U.K. and, once some technical bugs are dealt with, could someday save tons of food waste. The quick and cost-effective quality assessment system would apply a technique commonly used in space science to allow food suppliers to pinpoint the peak condition of produce. The researchers have identified the unique molecular markers given off by rocket (arugula) leaves before they spoil, and want to see if the technique can be applied to other produce. The big challenge, however, is to take the complex technology and apply it to a cost-effective platform so that it can be used at different points in the supply chain, from production through to retail, the researchers said. They have a working prototype but now need funding to conduct the production design and develop an affordable device.[Image Credit: © RitaE from Pixabay]
"Using Space Know-How to 'Sniff' Out Salad Quality", Science and Technology Facilities Council (U.K.), March 08, 2019, © UK Research and Innovation and Science and Technology Facilities Council
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Innovation
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Wyoming Project Plans To Build An Industry Around Two Ancient Grains

March 7, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The goal of the First-Grains Project at the University of Wyoming is to diversify the state’s agricultural sector – and hopefully build a profitable industry – by growing some ancient wheat strains and encouraging Wyoming brewers and bakers to use them in their products. The focus is on spelt and emmer, two wheat varieties that have been cultivated by humans for more than 12,000 years. It’s been a complicated endeavor because the grains still have their hull when threshed, so they have to be dehulled by a special machine before processing. They had to get one of the rare machines from Europe, and they had to find an appropriate pesticide. But the First-Grains project is rolling along. It recently trademarked the name "Neolithic Brand" to highlight the history of its product. The project plans to build a mill in Powell, Wyoming, where the labor and technical expertise to process it are available.[Image Credit: © Manfred Richter from Pixabay]
"Project reintroduces ancient grains", The Branding Iron: University of Wyoming, March 07, 2019, © The Branding Iron Online
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Production
Research
Source & Supply Chain
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

New Term For Restaurants To Digest: “Flexitarian”

March 5, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Food and beverage tracker Technomic reports that specialty diets are getting more diverse and restaurants need to begin thinking of ways to serve, not only vegans and vegetarians, but “flexitarians.” Also known as “semi-vegetarians,” flexitarians eat mostly plant-based diets, but also mix in occasional dairy foods and meats. The eating style works for those who want to eat healthier but are willing to leave room for a feast including meat or seafood once in a while.  "This desire for flexibility highlights the fact that dietary lifestyle choices are often not all-or-nothing decisions for consumers," a Technomic analysts says, adding that accommodating flexitarian customers by carrying a range of protein options or allowing them to build their own dishes is “a good start” for restaurants. Of 1,700 consumers surveyed, Technomic found that half eat a vegetarian or vegan dish at least once a month. [Image Credit: © Winsight, LLC.]
Amanda Yeager, "Report: It's time for restaurants to add 'flexitarian' to their lexicon", Baltimore Business Journal (Maryland), March 05, 2019, © American City Business Journals
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Consumers
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Carb-Conscious Inventor Tired Of Scooping Out Buns Develops Alternative

March 4, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A California-based inventor who routinely scooped out the insides of hot dog buns and bagels to lower her carbohydrate intake has designed a bun that sidesteps the problem. Dubbed “Hollows,” the gluten-free buns – a bagel/pretzel hybrid – retain the texture and taste of bread but with far fewer carbs. The “guilt-free” concoctions can be eaten plain or topped with anything from sea salt to poppy seeds to crushed pistachios, and more. According to InventHelp, the recipe is available for licensing or sale to manufacturers or marketers.[Image Credit: © WikimediaImages from Pixabay]
"InventHelp Inventor Develops Hot-Dog/Hamburger Bun for Carb-Conscious Consumers (SDB-1354)", PR Newswire, March 04, 2019, © PR Newswire Association LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Innovation
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Milk Dispensers In Schools Reduce Milk Waste, Eliminate Milk Carton Waste

March 4, 2019: 12:00 AM EST


Harrisonburg (Va.) City Public Schools measured milk waste for a week in January, finding that on average students consumed 220 cartons of milk at lunch a day, adding to about 39,000 cartons each school year. Because they are not recyclable, they end up in the trash. Moreover, students consumed about 70 percent of the milk in the cartons, wasting 30 percent, or about four gallons a day. To combat the problem, Bluestone Elementary School, and others in the state, are installing $3,000 milk dispensers in the cafeteria that allow students to fill their own reusable cups with as little or as much chocolate or regular milk as they want. The savings on milk aren’t much, about a cent per 8-ounce serving, but with a tight budget every little bit helps, a school representative said. Not to mention the complete elimination of trashed milk cartons.[Image Credit: © Daily News-Record]
Megan Williams , "Moo-ve Over Cartons; School Installs Milk Dispensers", Daily News-Record, March 04, 2019
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Companies
Packaging
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Retail Food Outlets Are Riding The Breakfast-On-The-Go Wave

March 2, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Market researcher NPD Group reports that the on-the-go breakfast trend is benefiting restaurants and other retail food establishment in the U.S. that cater to the growing number of busy commuters who can’t pass up the morning repast. The AM meal, whether snacks or breakfast, has been the only foodservice segment with year-over-year growth, according to NPD Group. Eating breakfast out can be both affordable and convenient, especially when it involves the top seller in the category, the very portable breakfast sandwich. The morning meal “represents a significant growth opportunity for retailers, especially with Millennials.”[Image Credit: © Free-Photos from Pixabay]
"Convenience Takes Over Breakfast", NACS, March 02, 2019, © NACS
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Foodservice Companies Adjust To Consumer Demands For “Clean Label’

March 1, 2019: 12:00 AM EST


Foodservice operators, including restaurants, retailers, and suppliers, say they are working hard to meet emerging consumer demands for “clean label” foods that feature simpler ingredient lists. Health-conscious consumers have become wary of foods containing artificial flavors or preservatives and “processed" or “chemical-sounding" ingredients. They also have grown to conflate the terms “natural," “healthful" and “wholesome." But no single “natural" term has emerged as the one Americans most associate with health, says researcher Technomic. Terms now found on menus and food products include: “preservative-free," “no artificial sweeteners," “unprocessed," “antibiotic-free,” “hormone-free," “organic," “clean," “GMO-free," “grass-fed," and “real." [Image Credit: © Ken's Foods, Inc.]
"Keeping it 'real' with clean labels", Restaurant Hospitality (Penton), March 01, 2019, © Informa USA Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Brands & Marketing
Ingredients
Trends
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Miss. Law Bars Cultured Protein From Being Labeled Meat

March 1, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has signed into law a bill prohibiting the labeling of animal cultures, plants, and insects as meat. The Senate bill passed unanimously in the state House of Representatives on February 28. The representative who handled the bill in the House said the legislation won't prohibit anyone from producing the products, but will prohibit labeling it as meat in Mississippi. A state senator said: "If it's not meat, it can't be labeled as such." Engineered animal protein and plant-based protein products, such as the Impossible Burger, are a growing trend in the U.S., raising concerns among lawmakers about accurate labeling. Other states that have either passed, or are considering, similar legislation include Missouri, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Virginia. The Mississippi bill will take effect July 1.[Image Credit: © Free-Photos from Pixabay]
Jimmie E. Gates, "Dems, GOP agree: If it's not meat, don't call it meat in Mississippi", Mississippi Clarion Ledger, March 01, 2019, © www.clarionledger.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
New Products
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Clean Food
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Starbucks Meal Donation Program In Canada Will Reduce Hunger, Cut Food Waste

February 28, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Starbucks Canada has launched a national initiative to provide ready-to-eat meals through its more than 1,100 company-owned stores. FoodShare builds on a successful pilot program with Second Harvest, the largest food rescue organization in Canada. The initiative launched in February at 250 stores in the greater Toronto area, and will expand to more cities and provinces and eventually to the whole country. In Canada, the company has always donated unsold pastries and baked goods, but will now donate more healthful breakfast sandwiches, paninis, protein boxes, salads, yogurt, milk, and dairy alternatives like soy and coconut. The company says the initiative not only helps combat hunger, it diverts food surplus from landfills, helping to minimize the company's environmental footprint. [Image Credit: © Starbucks Coffee Company]
"Starbucks Canada to the 'food waste' rescue!", Fast Casual, February 28, 2019, © Networld Media Group
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Market News
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Paris Baguette Plans Aggressive Expansion Over Next Decade

February 28, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The CEO of fast-casual bakery Paris Baquette, founded in South Korea in 1942, has big plans for expansion of the chain in the U.S. Paris Baguette has only 75 locations here, though there are more than 3,000 in France, Korea, Singapore, Vietnam, and China. Jack Moran, a former CEO of international bakery-restaurant chain Le Pain Quotidien, plans to open at least 1,000 U.S. cafés by 2030, with 38 opening this year. That includes a 50 percent increase in company-operated cafés and a 120 percent increase in the number of U.S.-franchised cafés. In addition, Moran will introduce U.S. customers to a more upscale version of Paris Baguette – Maison de PB – which will debut Singapore this year, and in Manhattan in 2020. Why the switch from Le Pain Quotidien to Paris Baguette? "I was knocked out by the quality and breadth of the baked goods selection," Moran said.[Image Credit: © Paris Baguette USA Inc]
Cherryh Cansler, "How Paris Baguette CEO plans to open 1,000 U.S. locations", Fast Casual, February 28, 2019, © Networld Media Group
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
New Products
Operations
Strategy
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
South Korea

Still No “Singular Definition” Of “Clean Label”

February 28, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The Hartman Group, a food and beverage industry trends analyst, says there really isn’t “any one singular definition” of the term “clean label”, but a handy rule of thumb might be: foods that are as close to their natural state as possible. Essentially that means foods that are “fresh, real, and less processed,” said a Hartman Group analyst. An Ingredion study found that consumers value ingredient lists almost as much as price as they look for products free-from additives and artificial ingredients. Seventy-eight percent of U.S. consumers find it important to recognize the ingredients used in the products they buy (up from 66 percent in 2011). Other considerations becoming important in food choice and clean label include specific health claims, the manufacturer/brand, and country/region of origin. Consumers’ most accepted ingredients include natural flavors, natural colors, flour, vegetable oil, and sugar.[Image Credit: © Robert Owen-Wahl from Pixabay]
Mary Ellen Shoup , "How to define clean label? 'There isn’t any one singular definition,' says Hartman Group", FoodNavigator-USA.com, February 28, 2019, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Trends
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Legalized Marketing Of Homemade Baked Goods Is Boon For Cottage Bakers

February 26, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
In the 48 states that permit the it, sale of homemade baked goods is improving lives in big and little ways, according to a public-interest law firm that represents the interests of home bakers in several states. Median monthly sales are a modest $200, but to many home bakers the money “makes a big difference to their financial well-being," the Virginia-based Institute for Justice states in a report drawn from a survey of 79 home-based bakers in Wisconsin, where a circuit court judge ruled in 2017 that laws against selling homemade baked goods are unconstitutional. Only New Jersey still bans the sale of bakery items made in a home oven. Wisconsin still bans the sale of homemade chocolate candy, cheesecake, cream pies or no-bake desserts. [Image Credit: © Pexels from Pixabay]
Mary Bergin, "Home bakers in Wisconsin are happily selling their treats, now that it's legal — you could too", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, February 26, 2019, © jsonline.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Rosy Outlook For World Functional Flour Market

February 25, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Market researcher Fact.MR expects “impressive growth” in the global functional flour market, thanks to the consumer preferences shift toward healthful foods and ingredients. Global sales of functional flour will grow at a CAGR of over 6.5 percent through 2025, driven by the health and wellness trend that is creating sustained opportunities for the manufacturers of functional flour. The segment is controlled by a few leading companies with global and regional reach. However, smaller companies predominantly operating across local markets are also in play. The leading companies will continue to focus on strategic collaborations, such as mergers and acquisitions with the small players to boost their production abilities and gain substantial profits, the company said.[Image Credit: © congerdesign from Pixabay]
"Functional Flour Sales Soar as Consumer Show Marked Preferences for Specialty Foods & Ingredients: Fact.MR Study", GLOBE NEWSWIRE , February 25, 2019, © GlobeNewswire, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Functional Foods
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Are “Newfangled Devices” The Answer To The Food Waste Problem? Maybe Not

February 24, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Nonprofit coalition ReFed says start-ups dedicated to fighting food waste attracted $125 million in venture capital and private equity funding in the first ten months of 2018. Products included smart tags that change color when milk goes bad, a mist to prolong the shelf life of fruit, and software to help grocery stores order the right amount of produce. Investors see food waste as “a big business opportunity," according to a marketing exec at Apeel Sciences, which sells a water-based solution that extends the ripeness of avocados by four days. But the products – and the trend – have their skeptics. Elizabeth Balkan, director of the Natural Resource Defense Council’s food-waste program, says, "I worry about this food-tech, food-waste boom becoming a food-waste bust."  Consumers are a major contributor to the food waste problem, so if they want to throw away less food, what they have to do is plan better and store smarter. “Newfangled devices” may not be the answer.[Image Credit: © Ben Kerckx from Pixabay]
Deena Shanker, "Big Money Joins Fight Against $1 Trillion in Wasted Food", Bloomberg , February 24, 2019, © Bloomberg LP
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Companies
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Pizza Beats Froot Loops In The Nutritious Breakfast Category

February 21, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Many breakfast favorites – e.g., Froot Loops and Cap’n Crunch – are made up of nearly 50 percent sugar, but more healthful alternatives are available. One of them, believe it or not, is pizza. Because pizza contains protein, carbs, and veggies – and way less sugar – word has been spreading that the food once considered junk is actually much more nutritional than breakfast cereals – if you choose the right ingredients. According to a nutritionist, a veggie-loaded whole-grain pizza with plenty of protein and not a lot of saturated fat “can absolutely be a healthier choice for breakfast.” Nutritionist-approved options include: hummus pizza; cheese pizza; mushroom, tortilla, or egg white pizza; and sweet potato pizza, topped with veggies, and fresh arugula.[Image Credit: © joshuemd from Pixabay]
"Great news: Pizza for breakfast is apparently healthier than cereal", Well+Good , February 21, 2019, © Well+Good LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

University Researchers Seeks Answer To Toxic Flour

February 21, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists at Kansas State University are working to find ways to ensure the safety of flour and products made from it. A handful of flour product recalls since 2015, both here and abroad, has raised the alarm among consumers. General Mills in January announced a voluntary national recall of five-pound bags of its Gold Medal unbleached flour, citing the potential presence of Salmonella. There have been no confirmed consumer illnesses as a result of the suspect flour, but the company issued the recall “out of an abundance of care,” according to a statement. The university is replicating commercial milling and baking processes and introducing E. coli and Salmonella at high doses to determine ways to reduce the risk of contaminated flour and finished bakery products.[Image Credit: © Free-Photos from Pixabay]
"K-State researchers seeking ways to protect flour", Salina Post (Kansas), February 21, 2019, © Salina Post - Salina, KS
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Some Grocery Chains Are Backing Away From Ugly Produce Promotion

February 21, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The "ugly produce'" trend may be fading at U.S. supermarkets. Walmart, Whole Foods and other stores experimented with selling blemished or “wonky” fruits and vegetables at a discount to keep them out of trash bins. But the two chains and others have quietly ended their tests: selling dented apples and undersized potatoes may not be all that appealing next to better looking fruits and vegetables. Though many stores and chains are still interested in ugly produce – Kroger and Hy-Vee are notable examples – others like Meijer in the Midwest, Hannaford of Maine and Pittsburgh-based Giant Eagle have backed away, citing lukewarm shopper interest. "Customers didn't accept it as much as we had hoped," said Mona Golub of Price Chopper, a grocery chain in the Northeast that also discontinued sales of cheaper ugly produce.[Image Credit: © Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay]
Candice Choi and SCOTT McFetridge , "'Ugly produce' trend may have limits, as grocers end tests", Associated Press Financial Wire, February 21, 2019, © The Associated Press
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Market News
Retail
Trends
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Time To Start Communicating What Food Date Labels Really Mean

February 20, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Johns Hopkins researchers say misunderstood food date labels – and keen awareness of food safety issues –are major reasons why as much as 31 percent of all food is wasted by supermarkets and consumers, according to the USDA. Under U.S. federal law, product dating is not required on food or beverage products, except for infant formula. Meat, poultry, and egg products may be voluntarily labelled if the labels comply with USDA regulations. A Johns Hopkins survey found 84 percent of consumers discarded food near the package date "at least occasionally" and 37 percent reported that they "always" or "usually" discard food near the package date. The researchers found that among labels assessed, "best if used by" was most frequently perceived as communicating quality, while "use by" was one of the top two perceived as communicating safety. The researchers concluded that there is a need for a strong food date labeling communications campaign, especially among those aged 18 to 34.[Image Credit: © Daniel Albany from Pixabay]
Mary Ellen Shoup, "Study: Food date labels can cause widespread confusion and unnecessary food waste", FoodNavigator-USA.com, February 20, 2019, © William Reed Business Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Companies
Consumers
Packaging
Policy & Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

German Government Sets Goal Of Halving Food Waste By 2030

February 20, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Acknowledging that reducing food waste is an "economic, ecological, and ethical obligation" for everyone, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cabinet has adopted a goal of cutting food waste in the country in half by 2030. The idea is not only aimed at customers in supermarkets, but also at food manufacturers, companies, organizations, politicians, and scientists. Every year, the average German throws away 120 pounds of food, an unfortunate and avoidable situation. The most important part of the plan is packaging food in smaller quantities, German experts say, which food manufacturers can certainly help with. [Image Credit: © MikesPhotos @ Pixabay.com]
"German government rolls out plan to curb food waste", Deutsche Welle, February 20, 2019, © Deutsche Welle
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Policy & Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Germany

Will Gluten-Free Soon Be An Obsolete Health Claim?

February 19, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A multinational team of scientists has developed a new genotype of wheat with built-in enzymes designed to break down the proteins that cause the body's immune reaction to gluten, which gives breads, pasta, and cereal their chewy, crunchy texture. The scientists introduced new DNA into wheat, developing a variety that contains one gluten-busting enzyme (or glutenase) from barley and another from bacteria Flavobacterium meningosepticum, both of which break down gluten proteins in the human digestive system. The researchers tested gluten extracts from the experimental grain and found that it had far fewer levels of the disease-provoking proteins. The enzymes reduced the amount of indigestible gluten by as much as two thirds.[Image Credit: © Manfred Richter from PIxabay]
Seth Truscott, "Healing grain: Scientists develop wheat that fights celiac disease", Washington State University, February 19, 2019, © Washington State University
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Functional Foods
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Hospital Adopts A “Room Service” Model To Cut Food Waste

February 18, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The rate of wasted food for an individual hospital can vary from six to 65 percent, according to a European report. The University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center, however, has implemented a change in its food service that has cut waste by 30 percent, no small achievement in an industry that tosses about $3 billion worth of food a year. The change? Instead of serving meals at predetermined times, it serves on-demand, much like hotel room service: when they’re ready.  The customization does require more labor, so UCSF had to roll out on-demand dining in waves as the labor and budget became available. But each time it was introduced to a new part of the hospital, food waste levels dropped by 30 percent. The hospital is now adding delivery robots to help ease the labor costs associated with the program.[Image Credit: © Ben Kerckx from Pixabay]
Dana Gunders, "Hospital Wastes A Third Less Food After This One Change", Forbes Media, February 18, 2019
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Dairy Co-op Demands That FDA Enforce Rules Regarding “Milk” Labeling

February 18, 2019: 12:00 AM EST

Wisconsin’s Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative has demanded that the FDA “no longer turn a blind eye to misleading labeling” of plant-based beverages as “milk.” In comments submitted to the agency, Edge called on the FDA to "take immediate action" to enforce existing regulations that define dairy foods as originating from cow's milk. The enforcement is “long overdue and increasingly important,” the co-op said. The FDA has asked for public input to help determine customers' understanding of the labeling and differences between dairy products and plant-based non-dairy products and the effects on purchasing decisions. The FDA says the input could affect any industry guidance it might issue.[Image Credit: © Edge]
"Farmer Group: Time to End 'Anything Goes' Dairy Labeling of Plant-Based Products", Dairy Business, February 18, 2019, © DairyBusiness, LLC.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
Trends
Clean Food
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Company Creates Stickers That Keep Produce Fresher Longer

February 18, 2019: 12:00 AM EST

Kirkland, Wash.-based start-up Stixfresh has developed a stick-on label it claims can keep fruit fresh for up to 14 days longer, thereby helping to reduce food waste. The coating on the stickers is made from beeswax and other natural ingredients that have a GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status from the FDA. The compounds work together to create a protective layer around the fruit. By slowing down the ripening process, Stixfresh labels can extend the freshness of a wide variety of fruits by up to 50 percent. The company is launching a crowdfunding campaign in February to give consumers anopportunity to test the product and join the brand. [Image Credit: © STIXFRESH]
"Stixfresh develops stickers to keep fruit fresh for two weeks", FoodBev Media , February 18, 2019, © FoodBev Media Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Companies
Innovation
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

EPA Plans To Regulate Toxic Chemicals Found In Drinking Water

February 15, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last month announced plans to set a maximum drinking water contaminant level for polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a man-made substance found in food packaging, cleaners, water-repellent fabrics, Teflon-coated cookware, and cleaning products. The contaminants are also found in firefighting foams, which have seeped into groundwater sources that reach millions of drinking taps. The process could take months at least, and critics say the move is a stalling tactic to protect industry interests, given the health risks known. The chemicals have been linked to reproductive and developmental conditions, as well as liver and kidney, and immunological effects. They also contribute to low infant birth weights, thyroid problems, and some cancers. By the end of the year, the agency will propose a regulatory determination, which is the next step legally required under the Safe Drinking Water Act.[Image Credit: © ImagesBG from Pixabay]
Ledyard King, "Critics scoff at EPA plan to regulate tap water toxins", USA TODAY , February 15, 2019, © USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vegetable-Based RightRice Debuts At Whole Foods Markets

February 15, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Popchips founder Keith Belling has introduced a vegetable rice made with lentils, chickpeas, green peas, and rice. San Francisco-based RightRice is a shelf-stable blend of more than 90 percent vegetables comprising 10 g of complete protein and five grams of fiber per serving, but has 40 percent fewer net carbs than traditional white rice. RightRice, available in original and three savory flavors, cooks like rice in about 10 minutes.  Each flavor comes in a seven-oz. pouch (about four servings) at a suggested retail of $3.99, and is non-GMO, vegan, kosher and gluten-free. RightRice is available at Whole Foods Markets nationally and online at Amazon.[Image Credit: © BFI]
"RightRice Introduces Innovative Vegetable Rice Grain With Exclusive National Launch In Whole Foods Market And On Amazon", PR Newswire , February 15, 2019, © PR Newswire Association LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

“Upcycled Food” Is A Marketable Term That Could Help Reduce Food Waste

February 14, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Drexel University scientists have reported on consumer perceptions of “upcycled food" – leftovers from processing that are put into new, value-added products – after originally using the term “value-added surplus products." A survey of more than 1,000 consumers asked what term would encourage them to buy products from materials leftover after processing, including salvaged, repurposed, reprocessed, and rescued. The clear winner was “upcycled,” the scientists found, because it’s a familiar term from fashion that suggests recycling and environmental goodness. What’s more, consumers were also willing to pay more for upcycled than conventional food. The researchers concluded that the right message and marketing would benefit food companies by reducing food waste while achieving equal or greater value from products.[Image Credit: © Couleur from Pixabay]
Arlene Karidis, "Addressing Consumers’ Perceptions of “Upcycled Food"", waste360.com, February 14, 2019, © Informa USA, Inc.,
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Consumers
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vermont Enters Final Implementation Stages Of 2012 Food Waste Law

February 14, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Enacted in 2012, Vermont’s universal recycling law (Act 148) is nearing the end of its long implementation phase. By July 1, 2020, Vermonters will have to keep food scraps out of their trash bins. The act quotes a waste composition study that showed more than half the state's waste comprises recyclables, yard debris, and food scraps that could be diverted and repurposed. In 2014, the law required some of the largest producers of food waste – grocery stores, food manufacturers – to keep food waste out of the trash. In 2020, individual residents will finally be required to do the same. When the law goes into effect, trash haulers must provide a food waste pickup service to customers. The requirement is being debated in the state capital, because trash haulers don't have the right equipment for this service and might not want to invest since the revenue stream isn't guaranteed, especially if residents compost in their backyard or feed scraps to animals.[Image Credit: © Hans Braxmeier @ Pixabay.com]
Amanda Brooks, "Vermonters prepare for food waste law", The Milton Independent (Vermont), February 14, 2019, © The Milton Independent
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Consumers
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Panera Bread Re-Introduces Double Bread Bowl For Two Weeks

February 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST


Panera Bread introduced a double-bowl version of its bread bowl nationally on February 14 for two weeks only. The Double Bread Bowl was available starting at $9.99 and is essentially the same as the classic bread bowl but twice as long, allowing for double the amount of soup or mac-and-cheese filling. Panera tested the Double Bread Bowl in Philadelphia in 2018. The company said a test launch  resulted in “an overwhelming response on social media from fans asking, 'When will Double Bread Bowls come to my city?'" [Image Credit: © Panera Bread]
Kate Taylor, "Panera is rolling out the two-bowl version of its famous bread bowl across America", The Business Insider, February 13, 2019, © Insider Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Pulse-Based Peatos Snack Beards The Lion – Er, Cheetah – In Its Den

February 13, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A Los Angeles-based start-up believes it is offering a more healthful alternative to the current orange-colored puffy snacks – read Frito-Lay Cheetos – that Americans love so much.  Peatos from World Peas Brand have replaced the traditional corn or potato base with a pulse (peas) base and have “cleaned up” the seasonings – all while maintaining “the explosive flavor and vibrant colors.” Peatos are a crunchy puffed snack that contain twice the protein (four grams) and three times the fiber (three grams) of competitor Cheetos. They are made with non-GMO ingredients, have no artificial flavors, no synthetic colors, and no added MSG. PepsiCo, parent company of Frito-Lay's Cheetos, last May sent a cease-and-desist letter to World Peas after Peatos began hitting store shelves. According to reports, PepsiCo said Peatos (tiger image) "is confusingly similar to and dilutes the Cheetos (cheetah image) brand." [Image Credit: © Werner Weisser]
"Junk Food Gets a Makeover as Consumers Nationwide Embrace World Peas Brand Peatos' “Better Than Junk Food” Crunchy Puffs", Business Wire, February 13, 2019, © Business Wire
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
New Products
Trends
Clean Food
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Home Bakers Seek Easing Of NM Rules On Sales At Farmers Markets

February 11, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Home-based bakers in New Mexico are eagerly supporting a bill in the state legislature that would legalize the limited sale of un-inspected food items, including bread, at farmers markets. The bill –House Bill 463, or the Food Freedom Act – was referred to, but not heard by the pertinent House committees. New Mexico has some of the most restrictive rules in the U.S. regarding cottage industries. Proponents of the bill say they would like to see a law similar to one in Texas – “a more lenient approach” – that acknowledges that customers at a farmers market know they are purchasing food prepared in someone's home. The New Mexico legislative session ends in mid-March.[Image Credit: © Pexels from Pixabay]
Dianne L Stallings , "More lenient law sought for home-baked goods at farmers markets", Ruidoso News (New Mexico), February 11, 2019, © ruidosonews.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Policy & Regulation
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

French Bakery Chain Opens Locations In N.Y. Area

February 11, 2019: 12:00 AM EST


French bakery and café chain Marie Blachère is setting up shop this month in the Long Island village of Great Neck, N.Y., and next month in Greenwich Village (Manhattan). The 35-year-old chain, with more than 500 locations in France, is known for its baguettes, but also sells croissants, brioches, fruit tarts, and – especially for Americans – muffins, doughnuts, sandwiches, and pizza. [Image Credit: © Boulangerie Marie Blachère]
Florence Fabricant, "Marie Blachère Bakery Heads to Great Neck, N.Y.", The New York Times, February 11, 2019, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
France

Generation Z Ideal Is Fast, Healthful, Eating

February 11, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Market researcher Packaged Facts says today's 18- to 24-year-old adults (Generation Z) are more likely than their Millennial predecessors to say they often snack between meals (74 percent vs. 66 percent) and, when cooking at home, are much more likely to prefer simple, easy-to-prepare meals (58 percent vs. 40 percent). Households headed by adults under age 25 are 29 percent more likely to eat shelf-to-microwave dinners and 26 percent more likely to eat frozen breakfast entrees/sandwiches.  They are also 23 percent more likely to eat frozen (complete) TV dinners and are 10 percent more likely to eat dry packaged dinners, dinner mixes, and kits. "Therefore,” a company exec says, “there's exists ample opportunity for food marketers of frozen prepared meals, canned soups, potato chips, and other canned and packaged prepared food such as salads and desserts, to convert adults under the age of 25 into loyal lifelong customers."[Image Credit: © John R Perry from Pixabay]
"Gen Z Adults Seek Foods Fitting Their Busy, Yet Health Conscious Lifestyles", PR Newswire, February 11, 2019, © PR Newswire Association LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Consumers
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Two Bakers Share A Love For Artisan Bread – And A Simple Business Plan

February 10, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Two baking entrepreneurs who share a love of sourdough bread have joined forces in Green Bay, Wisc., to make their artisan loaves in the kitchen of a parish school, sell it on the Internet, and deliver it to customers. They take over the kitchen, with its two ovens and large wooden work counter, after the schoolkids have been fed their lunches. The experienced online businessmen knew they had a good thing going, and they knew how to market it without much overhead cost. Customers order bread on the company website and the two bakers deliver it right to homes and retail businesses. The first week Voyageurs Sourdough had four orders, but they are now averaging 50 a week. The 28-ounce loaves sell for $10 each. [Image Credit: © Pain de la Baie Verte]
Kendra Meinert, "At Voyageurs Sourdough, fresh-baked artisan bread gets delivered to your door", Green Bay Press-Gazette, February 10, 2019, © www.greenbaypressgazette.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Zero-Waste Cooking Is Top Restaurant Trend In 2019

February 10, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
The National Restaurant Association says zero-waste cooking in restaurants is one of the major trends of 2019.  The basic idea is to create menu items that make use of ingredients that would otherwise be discarded as waste. Washington, D.C.’s Teaism restaurant, for example, has come up with a way to use broccoli stems trimmed from florets. The chef grins the broccoli stems, mixes them with goat cheese and seasonings, rolls them together, breads them with panko and fries them. Another restaurant breathes new life into used coffee grounds by cold steeping them to flavor homemade coffee ice cream.[Image Credit: © jacqueline macou]
"Zero-waste cooking trends: Broccoli stems and broken scallops ", National Restaurant Association, February 10, 2019, © National Restaurant Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Waste
Companies
Trends
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Science Is Helping To Make Bread Less Harmful For Some, More Healthful For All

February 9, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists are actively working on ways to reduce or eliminate components in bread (such as fructans and gluten) that create health issues for people with irritable bowel syndrome or celiac disease.  A Finnish company, for example, has introduced an enzyme called LOFO, which can help lower the fructan content in wheat bread. An American researcher has developed a reduced-gluten wheat using CRISPR gene-editing technology. For people looking for more healthful bread, European bakers are experimenting with tritordeum flour (a hybrid of wheat and wild barley) that yields 30 percent more fiber than traditional wheat flour. Other bakers are adding fiber by blending traditional wheat flour with lupin bean or lentil flour.[Image Credit: © Sabine Schulte from Pixabay]
Cara Rosenbloom, "Can’t stomach bread? Alterations to the carbs, gluten and fiber in wheat could change that.", Washington Post Blogs , February 09, 2019, © The Washington Post
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

USDA Issues Final GMO Food Labeling Rule

February 8, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
It took nearly three years, but the USDA in December issued the final rule implementing the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS) signed into law by President Obama in 2016. The NBFDS pre-empted state and local genetic engineering labeling requirements. The rule takes effect on February 19; implementation will be phased in over the next three years. The NBFDS requires food manufacturers, importers of food labeled for retail sale in the U.S., and some U.S. retailers to disclose foods and ingredients produced from foods that are or may be bioengineered. Disclosure can be through text, a symbol, electronic or digital link, or text message. For example, the text disclosure can say “bioengineered food” or “contains a bioengineered food ingredient” for a multi-ingredient food. [Image Credit: © BryanCave.com]
Bryan Cave , "Bioengineered Food Disclosure Rules Finalized, Require Disclosure of 'Detectable' GMOs", Bryan Cave Law Firm, February 08, 2019, © BryanCave.com | A Global Law Firm
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Clean Food
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Panera’s Nine-Year Experiment In Feeding The Hungry Comes To A Close

February 7, 2019: 12:00 AM EST

The last location of Panera Cares, Panera Bread’s pay-what-you-can non-profit experiment, has closed its doors. The St. Louis, Mo.-based company acknowledged that the concept launched nine years ago in Clayton, Mo., – and since then in other cities around the U.S. – is “no longer viable.” The community cafes posted a suggested donation for customers whose payment would cover the free food given to those unable to pay. The cafes were also supposed to raise awareness of hunger issues in America. The last Panera Cares café was in Boston.[Image Credit: © Panera Bread]
Brenna Houck, "Panera Bread closes last pay-what-you-can restaurant", Nation's Restaurant News, February 07, 2019, © Vox Media, Inc
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Market News
Operations
Strategy
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

German Researchers Develop Infrared Scanner That Senses Food Freshness

February 7, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Fraunhofer researchers in Germany have developed a mobile food scanner that will allow consumers and supermarket operators to test whether food items have gone bad. The pocket-size device uses infrared measurements to determine the ripeness and shelf life of produce and display the results via an app. The scanner, still in the testing stages, contains data for only two foods so far and permits the shelf life of products to be estimated. The core of the mobile scanner is a near-infrared (NIR) sensor that measures the ripeness of the food and identifies the amount and composition of its contents. Infrared light is beamed with high precision at the food and the scanner measures the spectrum of the reflected light. The absorbed wavelengths permit inferences to be made about the chemical composition of the food.[Image Credit: © Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft]
"Pocket-size food scanner to battle food waste", Fresh Plaza, February 07, 2019, © FreshPlaza.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Companies
Innovation
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Germany

N.C. Bagel Bakery Takes A Fresh Look At An Old Tradition

February 6, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
A bagel bakery in North Carolina is doing its best to shatter the myth that the only good bagels in the world come from the boroughs of New York or from Montreal. The owners of Benchwarmers Bagels are “asking people to try something new,” something that emerged from the joint efforts of a stone mill bakery that provides fresh milled grain and flour, and a craft coffee bar. Benchwarmers boils its bagels in a vat of honey-water before sliding them into a wood-burning oven on long wooden planks. They mix favorites like sesame, poppyseed and everything, with za'atar and sea salt and a Southern-inspired grits bagel. Their bagel sandwich fillings include duck rillette with sour cherries, house-cured lox with deviled eggs spread, and fried bologna with yellow mustard and an egg. The owners say they respect the bagel traditions, but new takes are long overdue. [Image Credit: © Benchwarmers Bagels and Coffee]
Drew Jackson, "Benchwarmers Bagels bakes with fire and challenges the bagel establishment", The News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina), February 06, 2019, © Raleigh News & Observer
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Market News
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Bread Revival
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Canadian Start-Up Gets $1M Investment To Develop An Upcycling Machine

February 6, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Halifax-based Beyond Food Inc. has raised $1 million from a range of investors – including several NHL players – to develop its first Zero Waste Pod and launch a partnership with a Canadian supermarket chain. The company’s mission is to reduce food waste – $31 billion a year in Canada – by using supermarket produce that is about to be tossed out to make a nutritional food ingredient. The patent-pending Zero Waste Pod is a modular facility about the size of a shipping container that can process aging fruits and vegetables into a fine powder for use as a nutritious ingredient in food manufacturing.[Image Credit: © Beyond Food]
Peter Moreira , "Entrevestor: Beyond Food raises $1 million to launch Zero Waste Pod", Chronicle Herald (Halifax, Nova Scotia), February 06, 2019, © SaltWire Network
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Companies
Trends
Operations
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Dangerous Chemicals Found In Foods Produced, Sold By Grocery Chains

February 5, 2019: 12:00 AM EST
Environmental organization network Friends of the Earth said that its testing found store and name-brand foods produced and sold by the top four U.S. food retailers contain residues of toxic pesticides linked to a range of serious health and environmental problems. The foods were purchased in 15 cities across the country by Friends of the Earth and a number of allies, including Environment Texas. Oat cereals, apples, applesauce, spinach and pinto beans from Kroger, Walmart, Costco, and Albertsons stores contained detectable amounts of glyphosate – key ingredient of the herbicide Roundup – organophosphates and neonicotinoids. The average level of glyphosate found in cereal samples (360 parts per billion) was more than twice the level set by scientists at Environmental Working Group for lifetime cancer risk for children. The average level of glyphosate found in pinto beans (509 ppb) was more than 4.5 times the benchmark.[Image Credit: © Friends of the Earth]
"New Study: Multiple Dangerous Pesticides Found in Food Made and Sold by Kroger, Walmart, Costco and Albertsons", Friends of the Earth , February 05, 2019, © Friends of the Earth
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Production
Retail
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Clean Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<12345678910>> Total results:8042 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.