We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?

Legislation Seeks To Curb Food Loss By Standardizing Label “Use By” Dates

May 18, 2016: 12:00 AM EST
With the single exception of infant formula, there are no standardized U.S. guidelines for food expiration dates. New legislation introduced in the U.S. House and Senate aims to rectify that situation. The problem is that food manufacturers put “use by” dates on packages to ensure that the food is eaten or cooked when it is freshest and at peak quality. But consumers assume the food is no longer safe to eat after that date. So it gets thrown out – wasted – by the millions of tons countrywide annually. The new legislation is designed to reduce the confusion by establishing standard federal rules for label dates. The bills were introduced by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn) and by Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine).
Heesun Wee, "Food waste bill targets confusing date labels", CNBC, May 18, 2016, © CNBC LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Waste
Companies
Packaging
Policy & Regulation
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
Categories
Companies, Organizations
Consumers
Legal, Legislation, Regulation, Policy
Trends
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.