We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<165166167168169170171172173174>> Total results:9330 References Per Page:

Organic Farm In UAE Shows What Can Be Accomplished In The Desert

April 29, 2010: 11:26 PM EST
Only few farms in the United Arab Emirates produce organic foods such as baby food, fruits, vegetables and breakfast cereals. But that should change soon. The government wants 3,000 hectares (7,413 acres) eventually set aside for organic farming. But organic farming in the UAE is not an easy proposition. Nazwa Organic Farm has been around for awhile and was recently certified by the government. It has overcome numerous obstacles, but it still manages to deliver organically grown crops to 170 customers twice a week at reasonable prices. Crops grown without chemicals must be harvested, transported and marketed quickly or they will spoil in the hot and humid UAE climate. The farm uses 50,000 gallons of well water a day, and spends $6,800 a month on electricity for its giant air-conditioned greenhouses.
Nadeem Hanif, "Organic at its best: Green and clean", Gulf News, April 29, 2010, © Al Nisr Publishing LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Bakery & Cereals
Fruit & Vegetables
Meat & Meat Products
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Middle East- Africa
United Arab Emirates

EFSA Continues Scrutiny Of EU Health Product Claims

April 29, 2010: 10:15 PM EST
Major changes in EU laws and regulations have affected the food industry, and more are on the way, according to a Euromonitor International briefing. The process began with “extremely protracted” new rules on nutrition and health claims and fortification in 2007. New organic legislation followed in 2009. The next several years will see an overhaul of general food labeling legislation that will have a significant impact on all food manufacturers. The European Food Standards Authority in October 2009 rejected more than two thirds of generic health claims submitted under the regulation. The biggest surprise was the rejection of 170 clinically-studied probiotic strains because they were not sufficiently characterized. Next on the EFSA’s agenda are long overdue nutrient profiles and a website listing of approved and rejected health claims.
Ewa Hudson, Head of Health & Wellness Research, Euromonitor International, "EFSA Dictates New Directions for EU Health Products", Nutraceuticals World, April 29, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Packaging
Policy & Regulation
Source & Supply Chain
Functional Foods
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe

Add These Three Supplements To A Weight Loss Program To Boost Metabolism

April 29, 2010: 06:22 PM EST
Obesity is exerting a major negative impact on health and longevity in the U.S., thanks to poor diet, stress and lack of exercise, all of which lead inexorably to fatal heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Eating nutritious foods and getting regular exercise are key solutions to the problem, but targeted nutritional supplementation that focuses on metabolism is fast becoming an effective component of weight loss programs. The top three supplements for that purpose are green tea, resveratrol and omega-3 fatty acids. Green tea’s natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds, polyphenol catechins, speed up metabolism. The grape skin extract resveratrol activates specific genes to fuel fat metabolism. And omega-3 fats from fish and fish oil directly influence fat storage and release of energy.
John Laundergan , "Top Natural Weight Loss Supplements", Technorati, April 29, 2010, © Technorati, Inc
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vitamin E Supplementation Improves Livers Of Some With Fatty Liver Disease

April 28, 2010: 10:15 PM EST
There is no approved medication in the U.S. for fatty liver disease, also known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a growing health problem characterized by excessive fat in the liver that leads to inflammation and liver damage. But a new study found that a daily regimen of vitamin E supplementation improved the livers of a significant number of patients and may offer some hope as a potential treatment. In the placebo-controlled 96-week test, half of the NASH patients ingested 800 IU daily of a natural form of vitamin E. About 43 percent showed significant liver improvement, scientists reported, while only 19 percent of those who received a placebo improved. Scientists stressed that the treatment did not help all patients, and that diabetic patients were not included in the study.
Arun J. Sanyal, M.D., Naga Chalasani, M.B., B.S., et al., "Pioglitazone, Vitamin E, or Placebo for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis", New England Journal of Medicine (advance online edition), April 28, 2010, © Massachusetts Medical Society
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Fermentation Science Continues To Produce Flavorful, Nutritious Products And Ingredients

April 27, 2010: 08:34 PM EST
The science of fermentation, including probiotics, not only impacts the culinary arts, but also nutrition and health. Fermented foods and ingredients – bread, wine, beer, cheese, etc. – offer their own flavorful and other sensory pleasures, of course. But adding the right microorganisms during the fermentation process also enhances the nutritional value of ordinary substances with micronutrients: polyphenols, for example, such as resveratrol and flavonoids, in wine. Awareness is growing that probiotics contribute to health in various ways. Scientific data support the health claims of various bacterial strains and probiotic products in areas like intestinal diseases, obesity, diabetes and other systemic disorders. But consumers and others need to understand that probiotic strains are not universally effective: one that relieves symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome may have no impact on another health problem.
Todd Runestad, "The Science of Fermentation", Natural Foods Merchandiser, April 27, 2010, © Penton Media, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Innovation
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Dairy Food
Fruit & Vegetables
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Pepper Compound, Dihydrocapsiate (DCT), Could Aid in Weight Loss

April 27, 2010: 11:40 PM EST
A University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) study suggests the heat-inducing traits of pepper could help people lose weight by increasing heat production. The study assessed the weight-loss potential of plants containing dihydrocapsiate (DCT), a naturally occurring and non-burning compound related to capsaicin from hot pepper but found in the pepper CH-19 Sweet. In the experiment, 34 men and women went on a low-calorie liquid diet for 28 days; the subjects then randomly took either placebo pills or DCT-containing supplements. Results showed increased energy expenditure among the group that consumed the highest amount of DCT. The study suggests DCT consumption together with a low calorie diet could aid in weight loss.
T.Y. Amy Lee, Alona Zerlin, Gail Thames, Zhaoping Li and David Heber , "Effects of dihydrocapsiate on diet-induced thermogenesis following 4 weeks of very low calorie dieting.", Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, April 27, 2010, © Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Prenatal Supplement Market Is Booming, Despite Warnings To Expectant Mothers

April 26, 2010: 09:21 PM EST
Though obstetricians, researchers and various health authorities warn of potential health risks to unborn babies and expectant mothers, pregnant women continue to purchase natural supplements, including herbals. A recently published study reported that about 10 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. expose themselves and their unborns to herbal products. Even traditional prenatal vitamin supplementation has come under close scrutiny. A recent British study, for example, cautioned that multivitamins taken late in pregnancy have been associated with premature births. But despite the warnings, and because of publicity about vitamin D and omega-3s, expectant women continue to buy products that make holistic, natural and wellness claims. Natural supplement suppliers are listening. NutraBella, for example, has introduced Bellybar DHA, a supplement that contains 200+ mg of DHA per serving.
Joanna Cosgrove, "Supplements During Pregnancy", Nutraceuticals, April 26, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

Study Finds Correlation Between Chocolate Consumption And Depression

April 26, 2010: 10:52 PM EST
Men and women who screened positive for possible depression were found to have consumed an average of 8.4 servings of chocolate a month compared to only 5.4 servings a month among those not screening positive, according to a U.S. study. Those who consumed higher amounts of chocolate – 11.8 servings a month – scored even higher on the tests, indicating a high probability of major depression. The researchers found that caffeine, fat, carbohydrates, energy intake and antioxidant-rich foods bore no correlation to mood symptoms. The study’s authors wondered whether depressed people may simply eat more chocolate because they’ve heard it boosts mood. And they couldn’t rule out the possibility that chocolate itself may contribute to depression. More studies are needed to determine whether chocolate is a cause or cure for depression, they said.
Natalie Rose, MD; Sabrina Koperski, BS; Beatrice A. Golomb, MD, PhD , "Chocolate and Depressive Symptoms in a Cross-sectional Analysis ", Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(8):699-703. , April 26, 2010, © American Medical Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Confectionery
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Eating Grapes Reduces Risk Of Heart Disease And Diabetes In Animal Study

April 26, 2010: 03:09 PM EST
Naturally occurring antioxidants known as phytochemicals found in grapes may help slow the downhill slide of high blood pressure and insulin resistance toward heart disease and type 2 diabetes, new animal research has found. U.S. scientists mixed powdered table grapes into the high-fat diets of lab rats bred to be obese. The rats that ate the grape-enriched diet had lower blood pressure, better heart function, and reduced indicators of heart and blood inflammation after three months than the control group of rats. They also had lower triglycerides, improved glucose tolerance and no change in body weight. The researchers will launch a clinical trial this summer to test the impact of grape product consumption on heart risk factors in humans.
E. Mitchell Seymour, Ph.D., et al., "Grapes Reduce Risk Factors for Heart Disease, Diabetes", Presentation at the Experimental Biology convention (Anaheim, Calif.), April 26, 2010, © University of Michigan Health System
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

USDA To Remove Synthetic Fatty Acids From Approved Organic Ingredients List

April 26, 2010: 07:54 AM EST
Responding to grumbling from organic food activists, the Obama administration has reversed a USDA decision from the Bush era to include synthetic fatty acids on a list of nonorganic ingredients approved for baby formula. The synthetic versions of the fatty acids DHA and ARA have been added to baby formulas for several years to give them some of the health benefits of human breast milk. The USDA isn’t suggesting that the additives are unsafe, only that food regulators disregarded established procedures when they awarded the organic seal. A top USDA official said organic regulators in 2006 misread the federal guidelines and failed to seek public comment on their decision. It is expected that the USDA will give food makers some time to change their product formulas.
Scott Kilman, "USDA Cracks Down on Synthetic Fatty Acids in Organic Milk ", Wall Street Journal, April 26, 2010, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

China Approves Omega-3 Fish Oil And Powder As Food, Beverage Ingredients

April 26, 2010: 08:56 AM EST

The People’s Republic of China has approved omega-3 fish oil and fish oil powder as “novel food ingredients” for use in any food and beverage category for consumers of all ages. Chinese food companies already include omega-3 DHA in many infant formulas and children’s foods. The approval by the Chinese government acknowledges that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids are necessary “good” fats that deliver health benefits that may be missing in the typical Chinese consumer’s diet, according to Ocean Nutrition Canada Limited (ONC), a supplier of omega-3 EPA/DHA food and dietary supplement ingredients. The company said the Chinese market “will quickly follow the lead of both North America and Europe, where omega-3 fortified food and beverage new product launches are showing excellent growth.”

"China Ministry of Health Approves Omega-3 Fish Oil and Fish Oil Powder as Novel Food Ingredients", Food Ingredients First, April 26, 2010, © CNS Media BV
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
Canada
China

Researchers Demonstrate Ginger’s Pain Relieving Abilities

April 26, 2010: 05:33 AM EST
Two studies by U.S. researchers have found that daily ginger consumption eases exercise-induced muscle pain. The research looked at the effects of 11 days of supplementation on muscle pain in two groups of volunteers who ingested capsules containing two grams of either raw or heated ginger or a placebo. Arm function, inflammation, pain and a biochemical involved in pain were measured before and after study participants performed 18 extensions of the elbow flexors with a heavy weight to induce moderate muscle injury to the arm. Both studies found that the daily ginger supplement reduced exercise-induced pain by 25 percent. Heat-treating the ginger, however, did not enhance the effect.
Christopher D. Black*, Matthew P. Herring†, David J. Hurley‡, Patrick J. O'Connor†, "Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Reduces Muscle Pain Caused by Eccentric Exercise", Journal of Pain, April 26, 2010, © American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Scientists Document Numerous Health Benefits Of Eating Chokeberries

April 25, 2010: 08:33 AM EST
U.S. scientists studying the health impact of the chokeberry found that lab rats fed chokeberry-spiked water weighed less at the end of testing than control animals who drank only water. They also had less abdominal fat, lower blood glucose, and reduced levels of triglycerides (fats) and “bad” cholesterol in the blood. The findings suggest the possibility that eating chokeberries could reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in humans. In addition, chokeberry-induced changes in the expression of genes might reduce chronic inflammation or even lower cancer risk. In the rate experiment, the chokeberry extract lowered expression of the gene coding for interleukin-6 (IL-6), a protein that triggers inflammation following trauma or infection and has been linked to diseases such as diabetes, arthritis, and atherosclerosis.
Bolin Qin and Richard Anderson , "Chokeberry extract found to regulate weight gain, blood glucose and inflammation in rats", Presentation at the Experimental Biology meeting ( Anaheim, Calif.), April 25, 2010, via EurekAlert, © American Society for Nutrition
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Skeptics Ponder Food Industry’s Commitment To Conquering Global Obesity

April 23, 2010: 11:53 PM EST
Though the food industry says it’s committed to reducing obesity and improving global health and nutrition, skeptics wonder about the depth of the commitment. “Big Food,” they say, is a major contributor to the world’s so-called “over-nutrition” problem, sometimes referred to as “eating too much junk food.” Can the food industry really be counted on to follow a course of action that might end up hurting its own sales and profitability? Experts argue that, despite some visionary executives and corporate cultures, there’s little evidence that Big Food is “becoming even a small part of the public health solution – rather than just a large part of the problem.” And relying on it to address the global obesity problem unilaterally is like basing global warming solutions on “the goodwill of the automobile industry.”
MARK BITTMAN, "Can Big Food Fight Fat?", New York Times, April 23, 2010, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Policy & Regulation
Research
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Lemonade And Other Dietary Strategies Can Prevent Kidney Stones

April 22, 2010: 10:59 PM EST
Kidney stones can be excruciatingly painful, and are often accompanied by fever and blood in the urine. But there are simple dietary ways to prevent their occurrence, or re-occurrence. Drinking four ounces of reconstituted lemon juice in two liters of water a day, for example, has been shown to decrease the rate of stone formation from 1.00 to 0.13 stones per patient. Other prevention strategies include drinking lots of liquids, and reducing the intake of salt, dietary calcium and protein. Once a kidney stone is detected, medication is usually the first and primary method of treatment. But sometime surgery is required. Surgical options include shock wave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy. All in all, prevention through lemonade therapy seems the wiser, and simpler, course of action.
Roger L. Sur, MD, "Five Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones: From Lemonade to Surgery", News release, UC San Diego Health System, April 22, 2010, © UCSD Medical Center
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Resveratrol Stimulates Enzyme That Shields Brain Cells From Stroke Damage

April 22, 2010: 12:47 PM EST
In a new U.S. study, scientists have discovered that lab mice given resveratrol, a compound found in red grapes and wine, before an induced stroke suffered significantly less brain damage than other rats. The researchers said that resveratrol apparently increases levels of the enzyme heme oxygenase that protects neurons from damage. The brain cells of mice that lacked the enzyme were not protected and consequently died after the stroke. Despite the encouraging news, however, the researchers caution against the use of resveratrol supplements. No one knows whether they are helpful or harmful over the long term, they said. And no one knows what amount offers the necessary protection. In fact, no one really knows how much red wine, or which kind, offers the optimal cardiovascular benefit, so further research is required.
Sylvain Doré, Ph.D., Hean Zhuang, M.D., Herman Kwansa, Ph.D., Raymond C. Koehler, Ph. D., "Resveratrol protects against experimental stroke: Putative neuroprotective role of heme oxygenase", Experimental Neurology, April 22, 2010, © Elsevier B.V.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Probiotic And High-Fiber Foods Show Steady Growth Globally

April 22, 2010: 04:04 AM EST
Consumer interest in foods that claim to promote digestive health continues to rise globally, especially in Europe, Australia, Japan and the U.S., where sales and new product launches of high-fiber and probiotic dairy products have been strong, despite a weakened world economy, confusion among consumers about the availability and benefits of digestive health foods, and uncertainties surrounding the legal status of product claims in Europe. U.S. awareness of digestive health foods has grown steadily in the last five years, thanks to innovation in the dairy sector. Dannon’s Activia yogurt, for example, was repositioned as a digestion regulation product that uses the Bifidus actiregularis cultures. Innova Market Insights credits the success of the Activia brand for moving probiotics dairy products into the mainstream yogurt market.
"New Products for Gut Health Still Show Steady Growth", Nutraceuticals World, April 22, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
New Products
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Dairy Food
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Europe
Australia
Japan

Sales Of Organic Products In US Grow 5.3 Percent in 2009 To $26.6 Billion

April 22, 2010: 03:25 AM EST
A new report, 2010 Organic Industry Survey, from the Organic Trade Association (OTA) found that US sales of organic products grew 5.3 percent in 2009 to $26.6 billion, with organic food contributing $24.8 billion. Organic products outperformed the total market: food sales were up 5.1 percent against a growth rate of 1.6 percent for total food sales, and organic non-food sales were up 9.1 percent. 38 percent of organic food sales came from fruit and vegetables, sales of which grew 11.4 percent and now account for 11.4 percent of all fruit and vegetable sales. 54 percent of organic sales were through the mass channel; natural product retailers sold 38 percent. In the non-food organic sector, supplements grew 35 percent and represented 35 percent of total organic non-food sales.
"U.S. Organic Product Sales Reach $26.6 Billion in 2009", Organic Trade Association, April 22, 2010, © Organic Trade Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
Trends
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Consuming Higher Amounts Of Added Sugar Boosts Lipid Levels, Cardiovascular Risks

April 21, 2010: 08:31 AM EST
In the first study of its kind, U.S. scientists have found a significant statistical association between consumption of high levels of sugars in processed foods with high levels of triglycerides (fats) in the blood, a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Examining health data on more than 6,000 surveyed adults, scientists measured added sugars as a percent of total calories, from less than five percent to more than 25 percent. According to the study, the average daily consumption of added sugars was 15.8 percent of total daily caloric intake, a “substantial increase” from 1978 levels. In addition to higher levels of triglycerides, average levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL-C) were lower among respondents who consumed higher amounts of sugars. “Our data support dietary guidelines that target a reduction in consumption of added sugar,” one researcher said.
Jean A. Welsh, M.P.H., R.N., Miriam B. Vos, M.D., M.S.P.H., et al., "Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults", Journal of the American Medical Association, April 21, 2010, © American Medical Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Packaged Foods & Meats
Sweets & Desserts
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Study Claims Added Sugars Could Worsen Heart Risks

April 21, 2010: 11:04 PM EST
Extra sugars in ready-to-eat and processed foods don't just make people fatter but also increase the risk of heart diseases by cutting good cholesterol levels and raising the amount of potentially harmful triglycerides, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Its findings suggest the average American adult consumes 21.4 teaspoons of added sugars, or 359 calories, daily. Researchers measured the calorie consumption from added-sugar of 6,113 adults from 1999 to 2006 and found an upsurge to 15.8 percent of calorie intake presently, up from 10.6 percent in 1977 to 1978.
Jean A. Welsh, MPH, RN; Andrea Sharma, PhD, MPH; Jerome L. Abramson, PhD; Viola Vaccarino, MD, PhD; Cathleen Gillespie, MS; Miriam B. Vos, MD, MSPH , "Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults", Journal of the American Medical Association, April 21, 2010, © American Medical Association
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Research
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Science Verifies Status Of Blueberries As A Super-Fruit

April 20, 2010: 05:01 PM EST
The nutritional and scientifically tested health benefits of blueberries have vaulted the tiny fruit into the ranks of the so-called super-fruits. Blueberies contain no fat, very little sodium and about 57 calories 2.4 grams of fiber per 100 grams. They are also rich in vitamin C and several phytochemicals, including phenolic acid and anthocyanins. Native American tribes knew a good thing when they saw it: they used blueberries for their medicinal benefits, especially for the blood. Modern science has verified their wisdom, finding in various studies that blueberry ingredients play at least some role in reducing the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and urinary tract infections, and improving memory and cognitive function. One 2005 study showed that phenols in blueberries inhibited the growth of, and even killed, colon cancer cells.
Toby Amidor, R.D., "Blueberry's Superfruit Status", Food Product design, April 20, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Trends
Fruit & Vegetables
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

FDA Says It’s Not Developing Rules On Sodium Content In U.S. Food Supply

April 20, 2010: 05:35 PM EST
The U.S. FDA, while acknowledging that America’s intake of sodium is too high and could be causing serious national health problems like high blood pressure, nevertheless denied a news report that it had begun a process of regulating sodium content in foods. “The FDA is not currently working on regulations nor has it made a decision to regulate sodium content in foods at this time,” the agency said in a statement, referring to a “mistaken impression” left by a Washington Post article. The agency said it would review the recently-issued recommendations of the Institute of Medicine regarding sodium content, and would work with other federal agencies and the food industry to reduce sodium levels in the U.S. food supply.
"FDA Issues Statement on IOM Sodium Report", FDA News, April 20, 2010, © U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Research
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

National Security Threatened By Childhood Obesity Epidemic, Say Ex-Military Brass

April 20, 2010: 10:53 PM EST
Escalating rates of childhood obesity seriously threaten national security, according to a group representing retired military officers said in a report that advocates support for new child nutrition legislation. The nonprofit Mission: Readiness group told Congress that 27 percent of all Americans aged 17 to 24 – a total of nine million – are too fat to join the military. “Too Fat to Fight” cites other factors that commonly keep young adults out of the military. But it said that weight problems have become the top medical reason for rejection from military service. The report analyzes data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that show a big increase in obesity among young adults since 1995 and advocates various steps to be taken to cut childhood obesity.
"9 Million Young Adults Are Too Overweight To Join the Military, New Report Shows", Mission: Readiness, April 20, 2010, © MissionReadiness.org
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Policy & Regulation
Research
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Organic Advocates Protest Relaxed FDA/USDA Position On GE Food Labeling

April 20, 2010: 08:53 AM EST
The nonprofit publisher of U.S. consumer research magazine Consumer Reports has joined more than 80 groups to protest a proposed FDA/USDA position on food labeling that “could potentially create significant problems for food producers in the U.S. who wish to indicate that their products contain no genetically engineered ingredients, including on organic food …” The government's draft position suggests that mandatory labeling of food as genetically engineered would “create the impression that the labeled food is in some way different” and would therefore be “false, misleading or deceptive.” GE ingredients are indeed different, according to the Consumers Union and groups representing farmers, public health, environmental and organic food organizations, and foods containing them should be clearly labeled as such.
"Letter to USDA from 80 Organisations Concerning GM and CODEX Labeling Problems", Consumers Union, April 20, 2010, © Consumers Union
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
News
Companies
Packaging
Safety
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Food Companies Replacing HFCS With Sugar, But Still Search For A Tasty Zero-Calorie Sweetener

April 19, 2010: 11:49 PM EST
Food companies are reformulating many of their products, especially soft drinks, with refined cane sugar, eliminating high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to satisfy health-conscious consumers who believe that HFSC is the culprit behind the U.S. obesity epidemic. Though scientists say corn syrup is no more harmful than sugar, it’s the perception among consumers that counts. In the meantime, companies like PepsiCo continue their search for a zero-calorie natural sweetener that tastes as good as sugar or corn syrup. Someday, CEO Indra Nooyi, who plans to boost sales of PepsiCo’s non-junk food products from $10 billion to $30 billion over ten years, predicts, "There will be a zero-calorie sweetener breakthrough."
Greg Burns , "Food-makers weigh sugar vs. corn syrup", Chicago Tribune, April 19, 2010, © Chicago Tribune
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Sauces & Dressings
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Study: Food Diary Data Shows Significant Link Between Fiber Intake And Lower Cancer Risk

April 20, 2010: 04:27 AM EST
The risk of colorectal cancer is apparently lowered when people eat a diet high in dietary fiber, according to a U.K. study that examined data from both food diaries and food frequency questionnaires. However, the correlation was only detected in the data from the food diaries. The discrepancy led the scientists to posit that previous inconsistent studies were marred by the questionnaire-based methodology. The new food diary-based study, part of seven U.K. cohort studies, included patients with and without colorectal cancer. Those whose diaries showed they consumed 24 grams of dietary fiber a day had a 30 percent lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. The food questionnaire data, however, showed no association between fiber and cancer risk and “may account for the lack of convincing evidence … in some previous studies.”
Christina C. Dahm, Ruth H. Keogh, Elizabeth A. Spencer, Darren C. Greenwood, Tim J. Key, Ian S. Fentiman, Martin J. Shipley, Eric J. Brunner, Janet E. Cade, Victoria J. Burley, Gita Mishra, Alison M. Stephen, Diana Kuh, Ian R. White, Robert Luben, Marleen, "Dietary Fiber and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Nested Case–Control Study Using Food Diaries", Journal of the National Cancer Institute, April 20, 2010, © Oxford University Press
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Bakery & Cereals
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Risk Of Bladder Cancer Rises With Greater Consumption Of Well-Done Red Meats

April 19, 2010: 07:41 AM EST
A 12-year U.S. study has found that those who ate the most red meat had nearly one-and-a-half times the risk of developing bladder cancer as those who ate little. According to the research, consuming beef steaks, pork chops, bacon, fried fish and fried chicken raised bladder cancer risk significantly. The amount of cooking was also found to play a significant role: the risk of developing bladder cancer nearly doubled among people who consumed well-done meats compared to those who preferred rare. Meat cooked at high heat generates carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs), by-products of the interaction between amino acids and creatine in muscles. Participants who consumed three specific HCAs were two-and-a-half times more likely to develop bladder cancer than those with low estimated HCA intake.
Jie Lin, Ph.D., Xifeng Wu, M.D., Ph.D., et al., "Red meat and heterocyclic amine intake, metabolic pathway genes, and bladder cancer risk", Presentation at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting (2010), April 19, 2010, © American Association for Cancer Research
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Research
Safety
Fish & Fish Products
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

UK's Premier Foods Introduces Heart-Friendly Bread, First Approved By Heart UK

April 19, 2010: 04:33 AM EST
The UK's largest food maker, Premier Foods, is to start selling a new bread line aimed at helping consumers manage their cholesterol levels. Its newest product, Hovis Hearty Oats, is the first bread to be baked with 50% wheat flour and 50% oats, which can help maintain normal cholesterol. It contains beta-glucan, an ingredient which, if consumed regularly can help maintain normal cholesterol levels. The bread is the first to be approved by heart-health campaigners Heart UK. Premier Foods said it wants to promote bread for breakfast in the UK, where health-conscious consumers prefer cereals. According to Heart UK, 65 percent of the UK population has high cholesterol levels.
"Premier launches heart-healthy Hovis", AFN, April 19, 2010, © Australian Food News
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Innovation
New Products
Bakery & Cereals
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Vitamin K Reduces Risk Of Developing Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

April 19, 2010: 04:50 PM EST
U.S. scientists have discovered a link between dietary intake of vitamin K and a reduced risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, an immune system cancer that affects the blood, bone marrow and lymph nodes. In a study of lymphoma patients and cancer-free individuals, researchers found that participants who consumed the highest amounts of vitamin K had a 45 percent lower risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, compared to those who consumed the lowest amounts. Vitamin K is derived from bacterial synthesis or from plants like leaf lettuce and spinach. Scientists also looked at the effect of vitamin K supplementation, finding that supplements did protect against non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but only up to a point. “The significance of this finding is unclear,” one scientist said, “but suggests that taking high doses of supplements is unlikely to be helpful.”
James Cerhan, M.D., Ph.D., et al., "Vitamin K May Protect Against Developing Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma", Presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, April 19, 2010, © Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Research Pinpoints Genetic Basis Of Olive Oil’s Anti-Inflammatory Benefit

April 19, 2010: 10:07 AM EST
The “Mediterranean Diet” of fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains and olive oil has for some time been associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome and, in turn, cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. Scientists in Spain have now discovered a genetic basis for that association, finding that consuming virgin olive oil rich in phenolic micronutrients represses several pro-inflammatory genes. The finding suggests that the diet switches the activity of immune system cells to a less harmful inflammatory profile. According to the researchers, "These results provide at least a partial molecular basis for the reduced risk of cardiovascular disease observed in Mediterranean countries, where virgin olive oil represents the main source of dietary fat.”
Antonio Camargo, Juan Ruano, et al. , "Gene expression changes in mononuclear cells from patients with metabolic syndrome after acute intake of phenol-rich virgin olive oil", BMC Genomics, April 19, 2010, © BioMed Central Ltd.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Cooking Ingredients
Fish & Fish Products
Fruit & Vegetables
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

U.S.-Grown Garlic’s Fortunes May Be Rising In Face Of Chinese Market Dominance

April 19, 2010: 04:42 AM EST

Thanks to various factors, including a bout with disease and low Chinese import prices, sales of U.S.-grown garlic have dipped in recent years. China is now the leading world supplier, supplying two-thirds of the world’s crop (and half the garlic consumed in the U.S.) Though a 376 percent anti-dumping tariff has had little impact on Chinese garlic imports, recent news headlines featuring tainted Chinese products may encourage U.S. consumers to look more closely at Chinese garlic, which is not subject to the same quality and food safety regulations as American garlic. And the U.S. product may have another advantage over Chinese competitors. According to one U.S. producer, who cites recent scientific tests: “California-grown garlic is two to three times more flavorful than Chinese garlic, negating any perceived price difference.”

Justin Guibert, Contributing Editor, "The Dirt on Garlic", Food Product Design, April 19, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Cooking Ingredients
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
China

Kids Still At Risk From Junk Food Ads Shown On TV

April 19, 2010: 12:32 AM EST
According to consumer advocates, most food and entertainment companies either lack policies on marketing to children or the policies are inadequate. Sixteen major food and restaurant companies pledged in 2006 not to market foods to children under 12 if the foods did not meet their own nutritional standards. But, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, “nutritional standards” is a vague concept that varies from company to company and from mom to mom. It wouldn’t be a problem, one nutritionist said, if the companies were marketing broccoli. But they’re marketing “sugary cereals, fast food, snack foods and candy,” all of which contribute to childhood obesity. One study of children showed that each added hour of television viewing led to eating 167 added calories from junk foods advertised on TV.
JANE E. BRODY, "Risks for Youths Who Eat What They Watch", New York Times , April 19, 2010, © The New York Times Company
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Research
Trends
Advertising
Bakery & Cereals
Confectionery
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Outlook Is Rosy For North America’s Omega-3 Fish/Algae Oil Market - Study

April 19, 2010: 12:08 AM EST
Market researcher Frost & Sullivan has released a forecast of trends, growth, and dynamics in North America’s omega-3 oils market through 2013. According to the company, the market comprises two product categories: marine (fish)-based oils and algae oils. 18:12 EPA/DHA marine oil, the largest product category within the North American omega 3 fatty acids market, is in the late-growth phase of its product life cycle, while fish oil concentrates are growing significantly. Three major trends are driving the omega-3 oils market: increasing consumer awareness, a sound scientific platform, and innovative technology. The demand for fish oil concentrates is due to a growing demand for dietary supplements, the researcher said. The study also examines drivers and restraints for growth, pricing, distribution, technology, legislation, demand and geographical trends.
"Omega 3 Market Report Analyzes Growth Factors ", Nutraceuticals World, April 19, 2010, © Rodman Publishing
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Market News
Research
Source & Supply Chain
Trends
Fish & Fish Products
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Growing Health-Awareness and Innovation Drives Yogurt Market Growth

April 16, 2010: 03:42 AM EST
A new report by US-based Global Industry Analysts estimates the world market for yogurt will exceed $67 billion by 2015, driven by rising consumer interest in functional and healthy foods and innovation delivering low-sugar, low-fat, anti-cholesterol and digestion-aiding products. The report, Yoghurt: A Global Strategic Business Report, claims yogurt is an ideal medium to deliver beneficial ingredients and companies are competing hard to differentiate themselves, with growing use of organic and natural ingredients, fruits, probiotics, and supplements such as Omega-3 EPA/DHA. Suppliers are also experimenting with different formats, such as drinkables and frozen yogurts; in the first quarter of 2010 there were a number of new launches by large companies suggesting innovation is set to continue.
"Yoghurt's future as a functional food assured", Scientist Live, April 16, 2010, © Setform Limited
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Innovation
Market News
Research
Trends
Dairy Food
Functional Foods
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Canada
Middle East- Africa
South Africa

Danone Stops Making Health Claims for Top Yoghurt Brands Activia, Actimel

April 15, 2010: 11:39 PM EST
Amid growing resistance Danone has stopped using health claims in marketing its Activia and Actimel yoghurt brands and has also withdrawn its request for European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) confirmation of those claims. Danone had been claiming that Activia, a fermented milk product with bifidus, aided the digestive system, and Actimel fermented milk drink enhanced the body's defenses against disease. An analyst said the withdrawal would adversely affect its business because the yoghurt brands represent up to 20 percent of Danone's sales. In February, EFSA said Danone's claim that the "immunofortis" ingredient in its baby foods can strengthen an infant's immune system lacked scientific basis. In 2009, the UK's Advertising Standards Authority upheld four false advertising complaints against Danone, while its US subsidiary paid $35 million to settle a similar lawsuit.
"Danone drops yoghurt health claims", AFP Via Yahoo News, April 15, 2010, © AFP
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Market News
Policy & Regulation
Dairy Food
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
France

Danisco Enters Expanded License Deal For Use of Two Fonterra Probiotic Strains

April 16, 2010: 03:52 AM EST
Danish food production company Danisco has signed another five-year licensing agreement for the use of the two probiotic strains, Howaru Bifido and Rhamnosus, developed by New Zealand dairy producer Fonterra Co-operative Group. The expanded licensing deal now allows Danisco to produce and market the two probiotic strains to customers worldwide for a variety of uses, particularly in food and beverage, and in therapeutic fields that will allow a broadened scope from clinical studies and health claims. Since it started licensing Fonterra-developed probiotics in 2001, Danisco has become a major probiotics player, with products that deliver digestive and immune health benefits and also developing new-end applications. In recent years applications for probiotics have moved beyond dairy to include fast-growing dietary supplements.
"Danisco and Fonterra expand probiotic cooperation", Danisco, April 16, 2010, © Danisco A/S Langebrogade 1DK-1001Copenhagen
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Production
Research
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
Europe
New Zealand
Denmark

“Raw Milk” Movement Gains Adherents, If Not Governmental Support

April 15, 2010: 03:09 AM EST
Though bucking scientific evidence, medical case history and state and federal laws, the trend toward consuming unpasteurized cow’s milk is slowly gaining adherents in the U.S., thanks to the Internet. So-called “raw milk” advocates believe the untreated product can cure a variety of disorders, including asthma and gastrointestinal problems. But public health officials beg to differ, noting that unpasteurized milk is laden with germs, including dangerous campylobacter bacteria, and is especially hazardous to children. Only ten states have legalized retail sale of unpasteurized milk. The rest have either banned it outright or allow it only on farms via "cow-share" arrangements. Nevertheless, increasingly vocal proponents are stubborn. "I have seen more kids directly harmed by vaccines," says one advocate. "I've never seen anybody whose kids were harmed by raw milk."
Elizabeth Weise, "'Raw milk' advocates, health officials step up dispute ", USA TODAY, April 15, 2010, © USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Policy & Regulation
Production
Safety
Trends
Dairy Food
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Europe’s Food Industry Pleads For Halt To Piecemeal Adoption Of Health Claims “Regulation”

April 15, 2010: 09:25 PM EST
More than 350 European food supplement makers, food manufacturers and ingredient suppliers have appealed to the president of the European Commission to stop the European Union’s proposed gradual, batch-by-batch approach to implementing a list of 4,500 functional health claims. A letter to José Manuel Barroso asks for his personal intervention to stop the piecemeal adoption of the list. The letter argues that the batch approach to releasing the “Regulation” distorts market competition, forces unnecessary and costly label changes, and “creates confusion in the market as non-harmonized claims co-exist with harmonized claims with unequal conditions of access to markets across the EU.” The current approach to implementing the rules will devastate the industry, the companies said, because many of the claims are for products that have been “used by consumers for decades.”
"European Industry in Mass Appeal to Commission President Over Health Claims Regulation", Food Ingredients First, April 15, 2010, © CNS Media BV
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Policy & Regulation
Strategy
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe

Hispanic Market A Major Growth Area For Food, Restaurant Companies

April 15, 2010: 03:31 AM EST
With food and restaurant sales declining among non-Hispanic consumers over the last four years, it’s not surprising that companies are looking to the Hispanic market as a growth engine, according to the marketing company Latinum Network. Sales from non-Hispanics slipped by $17.7 billion (2.4 percent) from 2004 to 2008, but sales from Hispanics soared 18 percent($14.8 billion). The increase is not accounted for just by population growth, either. Hispanics are spending a lot more, and that makes the market the only growth area for key food, beverage and restaurant segments, including crackers (sales up 12 percent among Hispanics) and candy and gum (up 8.2 percent). The trend doesn’t sit well with nutritionists concerned about obesity among Hispanics who, along with blacks, have a significantly higher incidence of obesity than whites.
Melanie Warner, "Why Food Companies Are Going Loco Over Hispanic Marketing", BNET, April 15, 2010, © CBS Interactive Inc
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Companies
Consumers
Market News
Research
Strategy
Confectionery
Savory Snacks
Sweets & Desserts
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

US Specialty Food Sales Grow 2.7% In 2009

April 14, 2010: 09:19 AM EST
According to figures from the National Association for the Specialty Food Trade, US sales of specialty foods and beverages were up 2.7% in 2009 to $63.09 million, with growth accelerating in the final quarter. Specialty items now represent 13.1% all retail food sales. It’s not all good news: not-for-profit NASFT’s annual report, The State of the Specialty Food Industry 2010, said that the recession had affected the industry, with companies cutting back on research and development, as well as marketing. Product launches fell 37% on 2008 and although over half of specialty food producers reported sales growth in 2009, 10 percent reported negative growth of more than 20 percent. Yogurt and kefir were the fastest growing categories, and Mediterranean, Latin and Indian were the fastest emerging cuisines. Traditional supermarkets are still the largest channel for specialty foods, and retailers say that nearly a quarter of the food is produced within 250 miles of the store.
"Specialty Food Industry Sales Rose 2.7 percent in 2009", NAFST, April 14, 2010, © NAFST
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
Research
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Cranberry Powder Prevents Bacterial Adhesion, And Therefore Infections, In Urinary Tract

April 14, 2010: 07:22 PM EST
Scientists have assumed for some time that drinking cranberry juice containing at least 36 milligrams of the antioxidant and flavonoid known as proanthocyanidin every day seems to prevent urinary tract infections (UTI). But inconsistent test results from nonstandard cranberry powder samples led European and U.S. researchers to search for the optimum level of cranberry antioxidants that prevents UTI. In this study, volunteers in Japan, Hungary, France and Spain who had been exposed to toxic bacterial strains, including E. coli, ingested various dosages of standardized cranberry powders each day. The researchers found that taking 72-milligram capsules of cranberry powder prevented bacteria from sticking to urinary tract tissues. According to the researchers, “Since bacterial adhesion is the primary step in initiation of UTI, consumption of cranberry may offer an additional means to help prevent infections.”
Amy B Howell , Henry Botto , et al. , "Dosage effect on uropathogenic Escherichia coli anti-adhesion activity in urine following consumption of cranberry powder standardized for proanthocyanidin content: a multicentric randomized double blind study", BMC Infectious Diseases 2010, 10:94doi:10.1186/1471-2334-10-94, April 14, 2010, © Howell et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Fruit & Vegetables
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Europe
Japan
France
Spain
Switzerland
Hungary

Whole Foods Revives Expansion Plans For The UK, Sales Rising Again

April 13, 2010: 09:49 PM EST
US-based natural and organic food vendor Whole Foods Market will expand operations in the UK as domestic business starts to pick up. The company said it is now scouting for areas in London to build new stores. Whole Foods Market opened its flagship store in London’s Kensington High Street in 2007 but had to shelve expansion plans due to the worsening economy in both the UK and US. The company, however, cited improving consumer confidence resulting in a 2.5 percent increase in same store sales in the quarter ending January 17. Whole Foods was one of the fastest-growing US store chains before the recession, with constant double-digit same store sales gains driven by middle class Americans' growing demand for natural foods.
Jonathan Birchall in New York, "Wholefoods regains appetite for Britain", Financial Times, April 13, 2010, © The Financial Times Ltd
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Market News
Retail
Strategy
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
EMEA
United States of America
Europe
United Kingdom

UK Organic Industry Eyes Rebound, Readies Major Campaign

April 14, 2010: 02:00 AM EST
Following a tough year in which organic sales in the UK fell nearly 13% in 2009, organic suppliers are seeing signs of a rebound. The Soil Association, a leading organic certification authority in the UK, claims some supermarket chains are increasing the organic lines they are stocking. The sector is also preparing for a major campaign that aims to convince the British public that organic foods are accessible to everyone and not only for the rich. The industry is seeking EU funding to assist with the campaign and is expecting a decision in around two months.
Dean Best, "Organic needs to get on message", just-auto.com, April 14, 2010, © just-auto.com
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Brands & Marketing
Market News
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Companies Need To Make A Healthy Society A Business Priority

April 13, 2010: 08:12 PM EST
Businesses should be paying close attention to the fact that health has emerged as a critical socioeconomic and personal issue that rivals concern for the environment. A recent study of 15,000 people in 11 countries found that protecting the public's health was as important as protecting the environment among nearly three-fourths of respondents. Scientific and technological breakthroughs have made it easier to protect and improve the nation’s health, but threats – aging, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, poor management of chronic diseases, bad behavioral choices – continue to reduce the quality of life, endanger economic development and put pressure on the sustainability of the planet. Some companies like General Electric have already begun to make health part of a “holistic strategy” that joins business outcomes with the common good.
Nancy Turett, "Health Is The Next Green For Business", Forbes.com, April 13, 2010, © Forbes.com LLC™
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Trends
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Research Into Coenzyme Q10 Provides Conflicting Evidence Of Health Benefits

April 13, 2010: 11:08 PM EST
There is a growing body of scientific evidence that supports at least some of the health claims of the antioxidant Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Research, some of it preliminary, has shown that CoQ10 supplements may lower the risk of cancer, heart disease, hypertension and migraine headaches, and could be used to treat heart failure and neurological diseases. CoQ10 appears to help the immune system lessen the heart-damaging effects of anti-cancer drugs, and it may help reduce headaches and treat muscular dystrophy and periodontal disease. But two decades of research into CoQ10’s impact on heart disease have been somewhat inconclusive. Some studies have shown that CoQ10 helps lower blood pressure, while some have found no significant impact on heart failure or angina. And seven clinical trials showed that CoQ10 did not boost athletic performance.
"CoQ10 for Cancer, Heart, Headaches", Food Product Design, April 13, 2010, © Virgo Publishing, LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Ingredients
Research
Meat & Meat Products
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Organic Food Trend Takes Root In UAE, Farm-To-Consumer Stores Emerging

April 14, 2010: 02:15 AM EST
Organic food has been gaining in popularity in the United Arab Emirates and recently a new innovation appeared with The Naswa Organic Farm that sells its produce through its own store. The farm produces 65 vegetables and herbs that are delivered each morning to the store and the small volumes mean goods are usually sold the same day. Local officials claim that organic standards in the UAE are more exacting than those in Europe and the farm was certified by the Ministry of Environment and Water after it has passed necessary inspection of its soil and produce.
Emmanuelle Landais, "UAE farm breaks new ground in marketing fresh produce", Gulf News, April 14, 2010, © Al Nisr Publishing LLC
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Retail
Source & Supply Chain
Strategy
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Middle East- Africa
United Arab Emirates

Whole Grain Flour From Maize Delivers Flavor, Texture, Healthy Ingredients, Company Says

April 14, 2010: 01:51 AM EST
Baking companies looking for a cost-effective way to enhance the whole grain and fiber content of low moisture baked goods while preserving taste and texture may want to take a look at Hi-maize from National Starch Food Innovation. The company says the new product derived from maize works especially well in low moisture baking applications such as muffins, waffles, pizza, pasta, biscuits, cakes, cereals, artisanal bread and gluten-free products. The whole grain produces a mild taste and yellow color, according to the company, and delivers the protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals desired by health-conscious consumers. The company says Hi-maize flour contains 25 percent fiber, at least three times that of existing allergen-free whole grain alternatives. Produced through traditional high amylose maize breeding, the flour is available in medium and coarse varieties.
"National Starch Lunches Hi-Maize Wholegrain in Europe", Nutrition Horizon, April 14, 2010, © CNS Media BV
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Ingredients
Innovation
New Products
Source & Supply Chain
Bakery & Cereals
Pasta & Noodles
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Thailand Considers Strategies For Beefing Up Organic Industry

April 12, 2010: 07:57 AM EST
The Commerce Ministry of Thailand hopes to tax and other incentives to encourage local entrepreneurs to exploit the global market for organic and natural products. The country says its plan is to expand exports of organically grown and natural products by 15-20 percent over the next year. Organic products currently have a market value in Thailand of US$93 million, with half to two-thirds of that coming from exports. The government is considering tax reductions for organic products and soft loans for organic producers as ways to promote market growth, with the revenue deficit made up by taxes on products not considered environment-friendly, according to a government official. Targeted products include organic rice, asparagus, baby corn, herbs and cotton. Non-food products might include cosmetics such as spa products and soap.
Thosathorn Kruthanawat, "Driving organic growth", Bangkok Post, April 12, 2010, © The Post Publishing Public Company Limited
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Market News
Policy & Regulation
Production
Trends
Natural and Organic
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Thailand

ConAgra Expands Private Label Bar Capacity With Elan Acquisition

April 12, 2010: 10:57 PM EST
US packaged foods company ConAgra Foods Inc. has acquired Elan Nutrition, a developer and manufacturer of nutrition food bars in a bid to expand its private label enterprise. ConAgra said in press statement that the acquisition, from an affiliate of Sun Capital Partners Inc., will boost its capacity to formulate and make private label bars, which it currently manufactures at its Lakeville, Minnesota facility. The terms of the deal are confidential, but ConAgra disclosed that it intends to retain Elan’s workers.
The Associated Press, "ConAgra acquires snack bar maker Elan Nutrition", Forbes.com , April 12, 2010, © The Associated Press
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Companies
Retail
Strategy
Private Label
Functional Foods
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Market For Low- And No-Sodium Foods, Beverages Surges

April 12, 2010: 02:16 AM EST
Low-sodium/salt and no sodium/salt foods and beverages have become a key 2010 food trend and a major segment of the food industry, representing $$22 billion, or three percent, of the total market, according to market research publisher Packaged Facts. The main reason for the trend is America’s consciousness of the healthy impact of cutting back on dietary salt (sodium chloride) and sodium and the increased availability of better tasting low-sodium/salt and no-sodium/salt products. The trend has spread beyond traditional niche markets (like over-55 adults) to health-conscious consumers. The movement has also caught the attention of foodservice operators, food manufacturers and retailers, many of whom now offer “low-sodium” shopping aisles. The key swaying factor for consumers? Palatability. The preferred strategy for manufacturers: gradual, rather than sudden, reduction of sodium content.
"Low- and No-Sodium Foods and Beverages Emerge as Major Culinary Trend", Marketwire, April 12, 2010, © Marketwire, Incorporated.
Domains
FOOD BUSINESS NEWS
Market Segments
News
Consumers
Ingredients
Market News
Research
Trends
Canned Food
Cooking Ingredients
Packaged Foods & Meats
Ready Meals
Savory Snacks
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<165166167168169170171172173174>> Total results:9330 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.